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Keywords

Pirates, Motivation, Pirate mythos, Enslaved people

Document Type

Research Paper

Abstract

In the middle months of the year 1720, Clement Downing arrived at the settlement of Saint Augustin in Mad­agascar, a midshipman aboard the Salisbury on its journey to trade in India. Led by ex-pirate John Rivers from 1686-1719, Saint Augustin was well-known as a resupplying depot for pirates operating in the region and, like other settlements in the immediate vicinity, was populated by “30 to 50 ex-pirates, or men waiting for a ship.”1 As ex-pirates, these men were said to have had “a very open-handed fraternity” with the Indigenous Malagasy populations; on rare occasions, the ex-pirates traded for enslaved people captured in local warfare and sold them to passing sailors or merchants.

Genre/Form

articles

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

Included in

History Commons

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