Event Title

An American Genocide

Streaming Media

Description

Between 1846 and 1873, California's Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. In his talk, Benjamin Madley described precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence. He then narrated the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Besides evaluating government official's culpability, Madley considered why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book.

Born in Redding, California, Ben Madley is a historian of Native America, the United States, and genocide in world history. He earned a B.A. at Yale University, an Master’s at Oxford University, and a Ph.D. at Yale. He then served as an Andrew Mellon Postdoctoral fellow at Dartmouth College before joining the faculty at UCLA where he is now Associate Professor of History and Interim Chair of American Indian Studies. Ben has authored a dozen journal articles and book chapters. An American Genocide is his first book. It recently won the 2016 Heyday Books History Award.

Document Type

Video

Start Date

18-1-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

18-1-2017 5:30 PM

Location

Western Washington University

Resource Type

Moving Image

Title of Series

The Ray Wolpow Institute Invited Speakers

Program

The Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity

Keywords

California Indian catastrophe, State-sanctioned killing, Vigilante violence, Indigenous resistance

Type

Text

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Jan 18th, 4:00 PM Jan 18th, 5:30 PM

An American Genocide

Western Washington University

Between 1846 and 1873, California's Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. In his talk, Benjamin Madley described precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence. He then narrated the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Besides evaluating government official's culpability, Madley considered why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book.

Born in Redding, California, Ben Madley is a historian of Native America, the United States, and genocide in world history. He earned a B.A. at Yale University, an Master’s at Oxford University, and a Ph.D. at Yale. He then served as an Andrew Mellon Postdoctoral fellow at Dartmouth College before joining the faculty at UCLA where he is now Associate Professor of History and Interim Chair of American Indian Studies. Ben has authored a dozen journal articles and book chapters. An American Genocide is his first book. It recently won the 2016 Heyday Books History Award.