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Confronting the Impacts of Structural Racism and Bias in the Justice System: the MMIW Crisis and the Racialized Policing of Indigenous People

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“Confronting the Impacts of Structural Racism and Bias in the Justice System: the MMIW Crisis and the Racialized Policing of Indigenous People,” a presentation by Bree Black Horse

November 30, 2021

Black Horse examines key federal policies, legislation, and court decisions that have impacted Native American people over the past two centuries that exemplify racial bias and structural racism. Black Horse explains how these federal laws and policies have impacted Native people in the criminal justice system and the safety of Tribal communities. Her talk will illuminate how the jurisdictional maze governing the investigation and prosecution of Indian Country crimes significantly contributes to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls across Washington State and the United States. Blackhorse will also address the long history of racial violence perpetrated against Indigenous people in the United States, as well as the racialized policing and unequal treatment Indigenous people continue to experience in Washington’s criminal justice system.

Bree Black Horse is an enrolled member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and a litigation associate at the law firm of Kilpatrick, Townsend & Stockton in the Native American practice group. She advises Tribal governments on all aspects of federal, state and tribal law, including tribal sovereignty, economic development, treaty rights, and complex Indian country litigation. Bree is a 2013 graduate of Seattle University School of Law, where she was a Douglas R. Nash Native American Scholar, and a former law clerk to Chief U.S. District Court Judge Brian M. Morris in the District of Montana. She is also Chair-Elect of the WSBA Indian Law Section, and Chair of the ACLU-WA Legal Committee.

Sponsored by the Department of History and:

· Departments: Sociology; Anthropology; and Political Science

· Programs and Institutes: Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Ray Wolpow Insitute; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Canadian American Studies and the Salish Sea Institute

· College of Humanities and Social Sciences

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Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

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Nov 30th, 12:00 PM

Confronting the Impacts of Structural Racism and Bias in the Justice System: the MMIW Crisis and the Racialized Policing of Indigenous People

“Confronting the Impacts of Structural Racism and Bias in the Justice System: the MMIW Crisis and the Racialized Policing of Indigenous People,” a presentation by Bree Black Horse

November 30, 2021

Black Horse examines key federal policies, legislation, and court decisions that have impacted Native American people over the past two centuries that exemplify racial bias and structural racism. Black Horse explains how these federal laws and policies have impacted Native people in the criminal justice system and the safety of Tribal communities. Her talk will illuminate how the jurisdictional maze governing the investigation and prosecution of Indian Country crimes significantly contributes to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls across Washington State and the United States. Blackhorse will also address the long history of racial violence perpetrated against Indigenous people in the United States, as well as the racialized policing and unequal treatment Indigenous people continue to experience in Washington’s criminal justice system.

Bree Black Horse is an enrolled member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and a litigation associate at the law firm of Kilpatrick, Townsend & Stockton in the Native American practice group. She advises Tribal governments on all aspects of federal, state and tribal law, including tribal sovereignty, economic development, treaty rights, and complex Indian country litigation. Bree is a 2013 graduate of Seattle University School of Law, where she was a Douglas R. Nash Native American Scholar, and a former law clerk to Chief U.S. District Court Judge Brian M. Morris in the District of Montana. She is also Chair-Elect of the WSBA Indian Law Section, and Chair of the ACLU-WA Legal Committee.

Sponsored by the Department of History and:

· Departments: Sociology; Anthropology; and Political Science

· Programs and Institutes: Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Ray Wolpow Insitute; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Canadian American Studies and the Salish Sea Institute

· College of Humanities and Social Sciences