Research Mentor(s)

Mary Erickson

Description

Fake Instagrams, or more commonly known as "finstas" have increased in popularity over the past few years. This study's goal is centered around finding patterns of behavior that explain the desire to use finstagram as a platform. I observed the culture surrounding finstas by engaging directly by creating and posting my own content while interacting with others' content as well. I created and used my finsta for three months, during which I observed and conducted interviews to expand on my own knowledge and understanding of this particular culture. I discovered three main findings through my research that supported individuals' need and encouragement to make and use finstas. These findings are outlined as limited audience, self-disclosure, and validation. Each finding is supported by supporting materials found through observations, personal experience, and interviews.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

16-5-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

16-5-2018 3:00 PM

Location

Communication Studies

Keywords

Finsta, Finstagram, Instagram, Social Media, Communication, Online, Accounts, WWU, Ethnography, Self-ethnography

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 16th, 12:00 PM May 16th, 3:00 PM

The Fake Account for the Real Self

Communication Studies

Fake Instagrams, or more commonly known as "finstas" have increased in popularity over the past few years. This study's goal is centered around finding patterns of behavior that explain the desire to use finstagram as a platform. I observed the culture surrounding finstas by engaging directly by creating and posting my own content while interacting with others' content as well. I created and used my finsta for three months, during which I observed and conducted interviews to expand on my own knowledge and understanding of this particular culture. I discovered three main findings through my research that supported individuals' need and encouragement to make and use finstas. These findings are outlined as limited audience, self-disclosure, and validation. Each finding is supported by supporting materials found through observations, personal experience, and interviews.

 

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