Event Title

Studying the Effects of Metal Toxicity in Lichen

Co-Author(s)

Tor Guddal

Research Mentor(s)

Ruth Sofield

Description

R. farinacea is a fruticose lichen know to grow in areas across the Pacific Northwest. Lichens are unique in that they sequester vital nutrients through the air by adsorbing particles. Lichen have been proposed as a bioindicator for assessing the quality of air and the quantification of regional metal particles. In an ongoing study, R. farinacea has been deployed in the south Seattle region to assess the effects of local metals and potential toxicity. There exists several methods by which these types of effects can be studied. The colorimetric method is a fast and easy way to look into the variation of color across the thallus to measure for adverse effects such as discoloration. Other biomarkers such as usnic acid, malondialydehyde, and glutathione, are biological methods to describe the complex metal interactions within the lichen itself. This study describes the different benefits and challenges of multiple methods and how to implement them in order to quantify the effects of metals on lichen

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2018

End Date

May 2018

Location

Environmental Sciences

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 16th, 12:00 PM May 16th, 3:00 PM

Studying the Effects of Metal Toxicity in Lichen

Environmental Sciences

R. farinacea is a fruticose lichen know to grow in areas across the Pacific Northwest. Lichens are unique in that they sequester vital nutrients through the air by adsorbing particles. Lichen have been proposed as a bioindicator for assessing the quality of air and the quantification of regional metal particles. In an ongoing study, R. farinacea has been deployed in the south Seattle region to assess the effects of local metals and potential toxicity. There exists several methods by which these types of effects can be studied. The colorimetric method is a fast and easy way to look into the variation of color across the thallus to measure for adverse effects such as discoloration. Other biomarkers such as usnic acid, malondialydehyde, and glutathione, are biological methods to describe the complex metal interactions within the lichen itself. This study describes the different benefits and challenges of multiple methods and how to implement them in order to quantify the effects of metals on lichen