Event Title

Mentorship for racial minority students by racial minority faculty

Research Mentor(s)

Ee Lin Lee

Description

This qualitative study examines minority student experiences in navigating higher education at predominantly white institutions (PWI) such as WWU. Through individual face-to-face interviews, 30 undergraduate students from the Humanities or Social Science department have been asked to reflect on their racial identities and educational experiences at WWU. This study's central questions were, "How is it like for a racial minority student to navigate undergraduate educational experience at a predominantly White institution (PWI) with the support of a racial minority faculty mentor?" and "How is it like for a racial minority student to navigate undergraduate educational experience at a PWI without the support of a racial minority faculty mentor?" This study is designed to bring awareness of racial justice and equity issues to different parties involved in the college of Humanities and Social Sciences and WWU. Critical Race Theory and Critical Mentoring Pedagogy serve as guides towards analysis. The findings will contribute to the understanding of the need for mentorship among racial minority students, particularly those who navigate the academic White waters without a racial minority faculty mentor as compared to those who are able to seek racial minority faculty mentorship.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2018

End Date

May 2018

Department

Communication Studies

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Mentorship for racial minority students by racial minority faculty

This qualitative study examines minority student experiences in navigating higher education at predominantly white institutions (PWI) such as WWU. Through individual face-to-face interviews, 30 undergraduate students from the Humanities or Social Science department have been asked to reflect on their racial identities and educational experiences at WWU. This study's central questions were, "How is it like for a racial minority student to navigate undergraduate educational experience at a predominantly White institution (PWI) with the support of a racial minority faculty mentor?" and "How is it like for a racial minority student to navigate undergraduate educational experience at a PWI without the support of a racial minority faculty mentor?" This study is designed to bring awareness of racial justice and equity issues to different parties involved in the college of Humanities and Social Sciences and WWU. Critical Race Theory and Critical Mentoring Pedagogy serve as guides towards analysis. The findings will contribute to the understanding of the need for mentorship among racial minority students, particularly those who navigate the academic White waters without a racial minority faculty mentor as compared to those who are able to seek racial minority faculty mentorship.