Event Title

The Role of Ethylene in Regulation of Pectin Modifying Enzymes and in Pectin Remodeling within Petunia axillaris Pistils

Co-Author(s)

Luke Damstedt, Riley Grasdalen, Scot Hook, Tierra Smith

Research Mentor(s)

Gerry Prody

Description

Pectin is the polysaccharide that cements plant cell walls together. During fertilization pectin is broken down to allow the pollen tube to grow through the pistil to the ovary. In this lab research was conducted to better understand the enzymes that are responsible for the breakdown of pectin during fertilization. Petunia axillaris pistils were subjected to ethylene treatments to simulate fertilization. Ethylene is the same plant hormone released upon exposure to pollen prior to fertilization. It is hypothesized that pectin methylesterase (PME) and pectin lyase (PL) are activated by the presence or absence of ethylene. Data was gathered regarding the activity level of PME and PL by utilizing size exclusion chromatography to analyze the alterations made by these enzymes to the pectin. It was observed that pistils treated with ethylene had a significant reduction in molar mass of pectin fragments as opposed to untreated pistils. Changes in esterification of the pectin were observed by ruthenium red staining. These findings supported the hypothesis that ethylene is responsible for the activation of (PME) and (PL). In the future more experiments regarding pectin break down will be done using tests to replicate the data that has been found along with UV-VIS testing.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2018

End Date

May 2018

Location

Chemistry

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 17th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

The Role of Ethylene in Regulation of Pectin Modifying Enzymes and in Pectin Remodeling within Petunia axillaris Pistils

Chemistry

Pectin is the polysaccharide that cements plant cell walls together. During fertilization pectin is broken down to allow the pollen tube to grow through the pistil to the ovary. In this lab research was conducted to better understand the enzymes that are responsible for the breakdown of pectin during fertilization. Petunia axillaris pistils were subjected to ethylene treatments to simulate fertilization. Ethylene is the same plant hormone released upon exposure to pollen prior to fertilization. It is hypothesized that pectin methylesterase (PME) and pectin lyase (PL) are activated by the presence or absence of ethylene. Data was gathered regarding the activity level of PME and PL by utilizing size exclusion chromatography to analyze the alterations made by these enzymes to the pectin. It was observed that pistils treated with ethylene had a significant reduction in molar mass of pectin fragments as opposed to untreated pistils. Changes in esterification of the pectin were observed by ruthenium red staining. These findings supported the hypothesis that ethylene is responsible for the activation of (PME) and (PL). In the future more experiments regarding pectin break down will be done using tests to replicate the data that has been found along with UV-VIS testing.