Event Title

Fixed Junction Light Emitting Electrochemical Cells Based on Polymerizable Ionic Liquids

Co-Author(s)

Erin Brown, Austin Limanek, Ariel Garcia, James Bauman

Research Mentor(s)

Janelle Leger

Description

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices are of interest due to ease of fabrication and potential cost-effectiveness. In particular, OPV devices based on fixed-junction light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have been demonstrated with promising results. An LEC is a device made of a thin layer of semiconducting polymer blended with a salt. The salt provides counterions that facilitate electrochemical doping of the polymer when an external voltage is applied to the device, allowing the formation of a self-assembled p-n junction analog. In a fixed junction LEC, ions within the active layer are immobilized after a desired distribution has been established, resulting in improved turn-on times and device lifetime compared to dynamic LECs, diode like rectification, and a significant photovoltaic effect. A variety of approaches for achieving a fixed junction have been demonstrated. For example, chemically fixed junctions have been established using ion-pair monomers (IPM) that immobilize concurrently with the occurrence of electrochemical doping, forming a fixed junction that remains stable under reverse bias at room temperature. Recently, chemically fixed junctions have also been demonstrated in light-emitting devices based on a polymerizable ionic liquid (PIL) in place of the IPM. These devices displayed improved light emission and turn on time as compared to previous chemically fixed junction LECs. Here we extend these results to the construction of polymer fixed-junction photovoltaic cells. The resulting impact on device performance as a function of PIL concentration, active layer thickness, and device charging scheme will be discussed.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2018

End Date

May 2018

Department

Physics/Astronomy

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Fixed Junction Light Emitting Electrochemical Cells Based on Polymerizable Ionic Liquids

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices are of interest due to ease of fabrication and potential cost-effectiveness. In particular, OPV devices based on fixed-junction light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have been demonstrated with promising results. An LEC is a device made of a thin layer of semiconducting polymer blended with a salt. The salt provides counterions that facilitate electrochemical doping of the polymer when an external voltage is applied to the device, allowing the formation of a self-assembled p-n junction analog. In a fixed junction LEC, ions within the active layer are immobilized after a desired distribution has been established, resulting in improved turn-on times and device lifetime compared to dynamic LECs, diode like rectification, and a significant photovoltaic effect. A variety of approaches for achieving a fixed junction have been demonstrated. For example, chemically fixed junctions have been established using ion-pair monomers (IPM) that immobilize concurrently with the occurrence of electrochemical doping, forming a fixed junction that remains stable under reverse bias at room temperature. Recently, chemically fixed junctions have also been demonstrated in light-emitting devices based on a polymerizable ionic liquid (PIL) in place of the IPM. These devices displayed improved light emission and turn on time as compared to previous chemically fixed junction LECs. Here we extend these results to the construction of polymer fixed-junction photovoltaic cells. The resulting impact on device performance as a function of PIL concentration, active layer thickness, and device charging scheme will be discussed.