Event Title

Operating mechanism of nanoparticle blend organic memory devices

Research Mentor(s)

Janelle Leger

Description

A host of new solid-state memory technologies are currently being developed as potential low-cost, high-speed alternatives to conventional silicon-based memory. Organic-based, bistable, rewritable memory cells were first proposed in 2002. The simplest structure for such a device is a single layer of conjugated polymer with embedded metal nanoparticles (NPs) uniformly distributed throughout. These resistive-switch devices display low write-rewrite voltages, high reliability, fast switching speeds, and high ON/OFF current ratios. Organic-based memory devices can be incorporated into a cross-point (x-y) structure, a promising device construct due to the high density of memory elements that is made possible. Polymer-based devices have the additional benefits of allowing a stacked structure for extremely low-volume packing of memory elements and the ability to achieve low cost device fabrication through solution processing. While several groups have made significant progress in characterizing these devices, a satisfactory description of the fundamental operating mechanism is still lacking. Understanding the underlying physical principles is a necessary next step in making further developments toward commercial viability. We will describe experimental progress toward developing a full understanding the underlying mechanism responsible for bistable electrical behavior in these promising devices.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2018

End Date

May 2018

Location

Physics and Astronomy

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 17th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

Operating mechanism of nanoparticle blend organic memory devices

Physics and Astronomy

A host of new solid-state memory technologies are currently being developed as potential low-cost, high-speed alternatives to conventional silicon-based memory. Organic-based, bistable, rewritable memory cells were first proposed in 2002. The simplest structure for such a device is a single layer of conjugated polymer with embedded metal nanoparticles (NPs) uniformly distributed throughout. These resistive-switch devices display low write-rewrite voltages, high reliability, fast switching speeds, and high ON/OFF current ratios. Organic-based memory devices can be incorporated into a cross-point (x-y) structure, a promising device construct due to the high density of memory elements that is made possible. Polymer-based devices have the additional benefits of allowing a stacked structure for extremely low-volume packing of memory elements and the ability to achieve low cost device fabrication through solution processing. While several groups have made significant progress in characterizing these devices, a satisfactory description of the fundamental operating mechanism is still lacking. Understanding the underlying physical principles is a necessary next step in making further developments toward commercial viability. We will describe experimental progress toward developing a full understanding the underlying mechanism responsible for bistable electrical behavior in these promising devices.