Event Title

Correlating Self-Reported Confidence with Time Studying And Math Preparedness among Computer Science Students

Research Mentor(s)

Filip Jagodzinski

Description

Education research across STEM fields has explored how math preparedness and time spent studying impact test performance. In this study, we explore how students’ self-reported confidence on midterm and final exam questions in an introduction to programming course correlates with the amount of time spent studying and math courses completed. For a 200-student CSCI141 class during Fall 2017, we used a questionnaire to collect information about each student's math courses taken previously. On both the midterm and final exams, students were prompted to indicate how much time they had spent preparing for the exam. For both exams, students were asked to specify their confidence level for each question on a scale of 1 to 4. We analyzed the data using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). We report that students spent less time preparing for the final exam than for the midterm. However, the correlation between time studying and confidence barely change between the midterm and final exams. Also, we observed a poor correlation between mean of self-reported confidence and amount of math preparedness. We concluded that the level of math and the time spent on exam preparation does not seem to have a significant contribution to a student’s confidence. Despite the varying levels of math preparation among the students, the mean confidence level averages near 3 (out of 4) across all groups.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2018

End Date

May 2018

Department

Computer Science

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Correlating Self-Reported Confidence with Time Studying And Math Preparedness among Computer Science Students

Education research across STEM fields has explored how math preparedness and time spent studying impact test performance. In this study, we explore how students’ self-reported confidence on midterm and final exam questions in an introduction to programming course correlates with the amount of time spent studying and math courses completed. For a 200-student CSCI141 class during Fall 2017, we used a questionnaire to collect information about each student's math courses taken previously. On both the midterm and final exams, students were prompted to indicate how much time they had spent preparing for the exam. For both exams, students were asked to specify their confidence level for each question on a scale of 1 to 4. We analyzed the data using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). We report that students spent less time preparing for the final exam than for the midterm. However, the correlation between time studying and confidence barely change between the midterm and final exams. Also, we observed a poor correlation between mean of self-reported confidence and amount of math preparedness. We concluded that the level of math and the time spent on exam preparation does not seem to have a significant contribution to a student’s confidence. Despite the varying levels of math preparation among the students, the mean confidence level averages near 3 (out of 4) across all groups.