Research Mentor(s)

Rae Lynn Schwartz-DuPre

Description

During December of 1865, a string of violence was unleashed as the United States witnessed the birth of its most infamous hate group, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). In the decades following its conception, the influence of the KKK has waxed and waned, but membership has always been a family affair. A photograph that exemplifies this phenomenon is one of a young boy identified as Josh, which was captured at a KKK rally in Gainesville, Georgia over Labor Day weekend in 1992. I argue that the photograph of The Little Klansman serves as an example of metonymy because it represents the historical and intense racial struggle within the United States that can be better understood when analyzed through the lens of Michel Foucault’s theory of surveillance. More specifically, Josh himself is an infantile citizen who is unknowingly endowed with the advocacy to expose the racial failures of our nation. The Little Klansman is a key example of how a child can shape the public’s interpretation of events and prominently represent the ever-present racial struggle within the United States.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

17-5-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

17-5-2018 12:00 PM

Location

Communication Studies

Keywords

Ku Klux Klan, Infantile citizenship, theory of surveillance, metonymy

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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May 17th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

The Little Klansman: A Symbol of American Infantilism Amidst Racial Tensions

Communication Studies

During December of 1865, a string of violence was unleashed as the United States witnessed the birth of its most infamous hate group, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). In the decades following its conception, the influence of the KKK has waxed and waned, but membership has always been a family affair. A photograph that exemplifies this phenomenon is one of a young boy identified as Josh, which was captured at a KKK rally in Gainesville, Georgia over Labor Day weekend in 1992. I argue that the photograph of The Little Klansman serves as an example of metonymy because it represents the historical and intense racial struggle within the United States that can be better understood when analyzed through the lens of Michel Foucault’s theory of surveillance. More specifically, Josh himself is an infantile citizen who is unknowingly endowed with the advocacy to expose the racial failures of our nation. The Little Klansman is a key example of how a child can shape the public’s interpretation of events and prominently represent the ever-present racial struggle within the United States.

 

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