Research Mentor(s)

Melissa Rice

Description

Reflectance spectroscopy is a major technique for characterizing the composition of planetary surfaces, and has led to key findings such as the characterization of alteration minerals indicative of an aqueous, neutral-pH environment in Mars’ past. When a reflectance spectrometer collects data, it does so at some viewing geometry, which is defined by the angular relationships between the light source illuminating the surface, the target material, and the detector. In the lab, this is usually at a standard viewing geometry (e.g. incidence=0, emission=30). In situ measurements taken by spacecraft, however, may be taken at a wide range of viewing geometries. This is known to have potential to influence spectral signatures, but work done to quantify the effects of viewing geometry on the spectra of natural rock surfaces has so far been limited. Western Washington University’s new automated goniometer enables the collection of reflectance spectra across a range of viewing geometries similar to those of spacecraft observations. By acquiring spectrogoniometric measurements for planetary analog samples in the lab, we will facilitate more comprehensive interpretations of spectral data from spacecraft than is currently possible.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Physics/Astronomy

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Keywords

photometry, spectroscopy, planetary geology, weathering, coatings, amorphous silica, Columbia River Basalt, nanohematite

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

An automated spectrogoniometer system with planetary science applications

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Reflectance spectroscopy is a major technique for characterizing the composition of planetary surfaces, and has led to key findings such as the characterization of alteration minerals indicative of an aqueous, neutral-pH environment in Mars’ past. When a reflectance spectrometer collects data, it does so at some viewing geometry, which is defined by the angular relationships between the light source illuminating the surface, the target material, and the detector. In the lab, this is usually at a standard viewing geometry (e.g. incidence=0, emission=30). In situ measurements taken by spacecraft, however, may be taken at a wide range of viewing geometries. This is known to have potential to influence spectral signatures, but work done to quantify the effects of viewing geometry on the spectra of natural rock surfaces has so far been limited. Western Washington University’s new automated goniometer enables the collection of reflectance spectra across a range of viewing geometries similar to those of spacecraft observations. By acquiring spectrogoniometric measurements for planetary analog samples in the lab, we will facilitate more comprehensive interpretations of spectral data from spacecraft than is currently possible.

 

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