Event Title

Archival stereotypes in animation

Research Mentor(s)

Jimerson, Randall C.

Description

Like many professions, archives and archivists have an enduring set of stereotypes associated with our instututions and practices, complicated by a lack of clear communication by archivists to the public about who archivists are and what they do. This presentation will briefly go over the more common and long-lived stereotypes of archives and archivists seen in media, explain where they come from in archival practice and why they have remained with the profession for so long, and then branch out into new examples from animated media (anime, cartoons, etc.) to show how creators perpetuate and address these stereotypes in a medium that has yet to be explored by archival theorists.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

History

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Subjects – Topical (LCSH)

Stereotypes (Social psychology); Archivists; Archives

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Archival stereotypes in animation

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Like many professions, archives and archivists have an enduring set of stereotypes associated with our instututions and practices, complicated by a lack of clear communication by archivists to the public about who archivists are and what they do. This presentation will briefly go over the more common and long-lived stereotypes of archives and archivists seen in media, explain where they come from in archival practice and why they have remained with the profession for so long, and then branch out into new examples from animated media (anime, cartoons, etc.) to show how creators perpetuate and address these stereotypes in a medium that has yet to be explored by archival theorists.