Event Title

Effect of large woody debris on ungulate browse on early successional riparian tree species in Elwha restoration, Olympic National Park, Washington

Co-Author(s)

Trevor Mansmith, Kenjo Pollmann

Research Mentor(s)

John McLaughlin

Description

We evaluated the potential for large woody debris (LWD) to limit the intensity of ungulate browsing on young trees and shrubs in Elwha ecosystem restoration following large dam removal. Growing forests on formal revervoir beds in an important goal of restoration associated with dam removal, but forest restoration success can be impeded when ungulate browse pressure is strong. The need to understand and mitigate browse impacts is growing as the number of dams reaching the end of their useful lives increases rapidly. We evaluated browse reduction from LWD by measuring browse intensity in two valleys along the Elwha river, Washington, where the largest dam removals in history recently were completed. We measured browse intensity within a set of randomly located 5m2 plots, stratified by the event of LWD enclosure. We compared effects of four levels of LWD enclosure on browse using analysis of variance. These results will have important implications for increasing the effectiveness of revegetation efforts following future dam removals.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Environmental Science

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Effect of large woody debris on ungulate browse on early successional riparian tree species in Elwha restoration, Olympic National Park, Washington

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

We evaluated the potential for large woody debris (LWD) to limit the intensity of ungulate browsing on young trees and shrubs in Elwha ecosystem restoration following large dam removal. Growing forests on formal revervoir beds in an important goal of restoration associated with dam removal, but forest restoration success can be impeded when ungulate browse pressure is strong. The need to understand and mitigate browse impacts is growing as the number of dams reaching the end of their useful lives increases rapidly. We evaluated browse reduction from LWD by measuring browse intensity in two valleys along the Elwha river, Washington, where the largest dam removals in history recently were completed. We measured browse intensity within a set of randomly located 5m2 plots, stratified by the event of LWD enclosure. We compared effects of four levels of LWD enclosure on browse using analysis of variance. These results will have important implications for increasing the effectiveness of revegetation efforts following future dam removals.