Event Title

Mechanical Evaluation and Comparison of Marine Composites

Co-Author(s)

Bentley, Taylor; Hess, Adam; Kellum, Daniel; Moran, Zena; McNamara, Ryan

Research Mentor(s)

Leonhardt, Eric

Description

Fiber reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) are the primary hull material for recreational, privately owned boats. Naval Architect David Gerr provides scantling rules--rules to determine how to design hulls--using a wider variety of materials that are open to home builders. These include plywood, strip planking with wood, fiberglass, and a composite sandwich material using a wood core with thin skins of epoxy reinforced with a copolymer of acrylonitrile and vinyl chloride(trade name Dynel). This project will compare the specific tensile and flexural strength of these materials. The project will attempt to compare tensile fatigue data on the materials as well. The project will help determine if the wood core/Dynel material can produce a lighter hull than a conventional fiberglass hull for the same required mechanical performance.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Engineering and Design

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Subjects – Topical (LCSH)

Composite materials--Mechanical properties; Marine engineering; Fibrous composites; Polymeric composites

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Mechanical Evaluation and Comparison of Marine Composites

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Fiber reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) are the primary hull material for recreational, privately owned boats. Naval Architect David Gerr provides scantling rules--rules to determine how to design hulls--using a wider variety of materials that are open to home builders. These include plywood, strip planking with wood, fiberglass, and a composite sandwich material using a wood core with thin skins of epoxy reinforced with a copolymer of acrylonitrile and vinyl chloride(trade name Dynel). This project will compare the specific tensile and flexural strength of these materials. The project will attempt to compare tensile fatigue data on the materials as well. The project will help determine if the wood core/Dynel material can produce a lighter hull than a conventional fiberglass hull for the same required mechanical performance.