Research Mentor(s)

Nick Galati

Description

Virtually every cell in the human body has a small antenna projecting from its surface called a primary cilium (plural, cilia). Proteins must be constantly moved to and from cilia in order for cilia to continue their function. This movement is referred to as protein trafficking. IFT20 is a protein that is heavily involved in protein trafficking in and out of cilia. The trafficking patterns of IFT20 can be studied by making it visible under a fluorescent microscope. We are particularly interested in how IFT20 interacts with another protein around the cilium called Pericentrin and how their interaction affects IFT20 trafficking. The gene that produces Pericentrin is located on the 21st chromosome and is over expressed when a cell has a third copy of chromosome 21. Having three copies of chromosome 21 is called trisomy 21 but is more commonly known as Down syndrome. Since Pericentrin is overexpressed in trisomy 21 and is heavily involved in ciliary processes, it is of high interest to study how Pericentrin interacts with IFT20. We will then be able to use that interaction as a model for other protein trafficking interactions near the cilium. We expect that an increase in the amount of Pericentrin will restrict IFT20 as it traffics to and from the cilium.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Biology

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Keywords

Cellular Biology, Protein Trafficking, Fluorescent Microscopy

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

A molecular traffic jam: How overexpression of Pericentrin restricts the movement of IFT20 between the Golgi apparatus and the Primary Cilium

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Virtually every cell in the human body has a small antenna projecting from its surface called a primary cilium (plural, cilia). Proteins must be constantly moved to and from cilia in order for cilia to continue their function. This movement is referred to as protein trafficking. IFT20 is a protein that is heavily involved in protein trafficking in and out of cilia. The trafficking patterns of IFT20 can be studied by making it visible under a fluorescent microscope. We are particularly interested in how IFT20 interacts with another protein around the cilium called Pericentrin and how their interaction affects IFT20 trafficking. The gene that produces Pericentrin is located on the 21st chromosome and is over expressed when a cell has a third copy of chromosome 21. Having three copies of chromosome 21 is called trisomy 21 but is more commonly known as Down syndrome. Since Pericentrin is overexpressed in trisomy 21 and is heavily involved in ciliary processes, it is of high interest to study how Pericentrin interacts with IFT20. We will then be able to use that interaction as a model for other protein trafficking interactions near the cilium. We expect that an increase in the amount of Pericentrin will restrict IFT20 as it traffics to and from the cilium.

 

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