Event Title

Risk assessment framework for the introduction of transgenic house mice into the Farallones

Co-Author(s)

Steven Eikenbary, Wayne Landis

Research Mentor(s)

Wayne Landis

Description

To potentially reduce or eliminate the need for chemical rodenticides, the use of an engineered selfish genetic element, or “gene drive” has been proposed to eradicate mouse populations from island systems. The intended effect of this construct is to spread from male mice to their female offspring at an above-Mendelian rate of inheritance, causing female sterility and, hypothetically, an eradication of the island mouse population. However, a quantitative and probabilistic risk assessment has yet to be conducted concerning the release of “gene-drive-modified” house mice into the environment. To begin tackling this issue, we have developed a preliminary risk assessment framework for the theoretical release of transgenic house mice (Mus musculus) into the Farallon Islands using the Bayesian Network – Relative Risk Model, which can incorporate toxicological, ecological, and “gene drive” stressors at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Endpoints include abundance of select species in the Farallones, a national wildlife refuge west of the Golden Gate, and potential change in the necessity of chemical rodenticide application on the islands.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Environmental Science

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Risk assessment framework for the introduction of transgenic house mice into the Farallones

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

To potentially reduce or eliminate the need for chemical rodenticides, the use of an engineered selfish genetic element, or “gene drive” has been proposed to eradicate mouse populations from island systems. The intended effect of this construct is to spread from male mice to their female offspring at an above-Mendelian rate of inheritance, causing female sterility and, hypothetically, an eradication of the island mouse population. However, a quantitative and probabilistic risk assessment has yet to be conducted concerning the release of “gene-drive-modified” house mice into the environment. To begin tackling this issue, we have developed a preliminary risk assessment framework for the theoretical release of transgenic house mice (Mus musculus) into the Farallon Islands using the Bayesian Network – Relative Risk Model, which can incorporate toxicological, ecological, and “gene drive” stressors at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Endpoints include abundance of select species in the Farallones, a national wildlife refuge west of the Golden Gate, and potential change in the necessity of chemical rodenticide application on the islands.