Event Title

State-Owned Enterprises and Sovereign Wealth Funds: An Economic Assessment

Co-Author(s)

Steve Globerman, Daniel Shapiro

Research Mentor(s)

Steve Globerman

Description

A prominent phenomenon that has been the source of increasing attention and concern on the part of many politicians and business leaders, especially in the United States and other developed countries, is the role of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) in the international economy. The direct and indirect linkages between SOEs and SWFs and their national governments raise important public policy issues, especially in the context of international trade and investment flows. Governments in developed Western countries have become increasingly skeptical of the net benefits of allowing government-owned (or influenced) companies to invest in their economies. The broad concern is that government ownership results in organizations pursuing “non-commercial” objectives, which may not only impair their efficiency but may also do economic harm to the host economy. Non-commercial objectives might even include carrying out espionage or sabotage in host countries that are potentially or actually in conflict with the SOEs’ home states

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

MBA (Master of Business Administration)

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

State-Owned Enterprises and Sovereign Wealth Funds: An Economic Assessment

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

A prominent phenomenon that has been the source of increasing attention and concern on the part of many politicians and business leaders, especially in the United States and other developed countries, is the role of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) in the international economy. The direct and indirect linkages between SOEs and SWFs and their national governments raise important public policy issues, especially in the context of international trade and investment flows. Governments in developed Western countries have become increasingly skeptical of the net benefits of allowing government-owned (or influenced) companies to invest in their economies. The broad concern is that government ownership results in organizations pursuing “non-commercial” objectives, which may not only impair their efficiency but may also do economic harm to the host economy. Non-commercial objectives might even include carrying out espionage or sabotage in host countries that are potentially or actually in conflict with the SOEs’ home states