Research Mentor(s)

Flower, Aquila

Description

Insect outbreaks are one of the important natural disturbance processes in forested ecosystems due to their tendency to periodically restructure stand composition and provide dynamic fluctuation via trophic interactions. Multiple agencies across various jurisdictions collect annual forest health inventory data via aerial detection survey (ADS) mapping, allowing trends in forest disease and pest prevalence to be explored across both space and time. While these data sets are a powerful tool for research and management, the data is often recorded and stored in regionally differing formats and is not easily accessible to researchers or the public. The lack of cohesive broad-scale datasets prevents analysis of natural disturbance dynamics across ecological regions. This project combines ADS data from adjoined management regions spanning Washington, Oregon and British Columbia encompassing the time period between 1980 and 2000 focusing on Western spruce budworm (WSB) (Choristoneura occidentalis), a prolific and widespread defoliator of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). This compiled dataset will allow preliminary analysis of a natural process unbound by artificial boundaries and potentially provide new insights into WSB outbreak dynamics in the Pacific Northwest.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Environmental Studies

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Keywords

Western spruce budworm, insect outbreaks

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Two decades of Western spruce budworm outbreaks in the Pacific Northwest

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Insect outbreaks are one of the important natural disturbance processes in forested ecosystems due to their tendency to periodically restructure stand composition and provide dynamic fluctuation via trophic interactions. Multiple agencies across various jurisdictions collect annual forest health inventory data via aerial detection survey (ADS) mapping, allowing trends in forest disease and pest prevalence to be explored across both space and time. While these data sets are a powerful tool for research and management, the data is often recorded and stored in regionally differing formats and is not easily accessible to researchers or the public. The lack of cohesive broad-scale datasets prevents analysis of natural disturbance dynamics across ecological regions. This project combines ADS data from adjoined management regions spanning Washington, Oregon and British Columbia encompassing the time period between 1980 and 2000 focusing on Western spruce budworm (WSB) (Choristoneura occidentalis), a prolific and widespread defoliator of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). This compiled dataset will allow preliminary analysis of a natural process unbound by artificial boundaries and potentially provide new insights into WSB outbreak dynamics in the Pacific Northwest.

 

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