Research Mentor(s)

Calderon, Dolores

Description

It may appear that the marginalization of people with disabilities/impairments and the marginalization of colonized subjects are separate issues, even if they sometimes intersect in the bodyminds of disabled Indigenous individuals. However, the marginalization and oppression of disabled and Indigenous people goes beyond the “simple” intersecting of oppressions. Indigenous peoples and those constructed by Western culture to have disabilities are disempowered and marginalized by deeply overlapping and mutually reinforcing mechanisms of oppression. My academic goal for this research was to engage in a borderland dialogue between Indigenous and Western worldviews around conceptions of health and unwellness, as a basis for radical re-imaginings of disability within a Western context. During the course of this research I read eighteen articles regarding the intersections of colonialism, disability, and indigeneity. I studied how Indigenous people and disabled people are similarly marginalized by interlocking forces of colonization and eugenics. I researched the foundations of Eurocentric thought that underpin that colonization and ableism. I learned about the ways in which Indigenous worldviews radically differ from Eurocentric ones, as well as the theoretical and actual effects of those worldviews on Indigenous people with impairments living in traditional Indigenous communities. As a result of this research, since WWU does not currently offer consistent critical disability studies courses, I created an annotated bibliography summarizing the eighteen articles I read, to share with students and faculty. I also created a thirty-minute video presentation outlining my research and the synthesis thereof, which is publicly available on YouTube.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

18-5-2020 12:00 AM

End Date

22-5-2020 12:00 AM

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Keywords

Decolonial Studies, Critical Disability Studies, Indigenous, Eugenics, Ableism, Colonialism.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
May 18th, 12:00 AM May 22nd, 12:00 AM

Decolonizing Disability: An Independent Research Project

It may appear that the marginalization of people with disabilities/impairments and the marginalization of colonized subjects are separate issues, even if they sometimes intersect in the bodyminds of disabled Indigenous individuals. However, the marginalization and oppression of disabled and Indigenous people goes beyond the “simple” intersecting of oppressions. Indigenous peoples and those constructed by Western culture to have disabilities are disempowered and marginalized by deeply overlapping and mutually reinforcing mechanisms of oppression. My academic goal for this research was to engage in a borderland dialogue between Indigenous and Western worldviews around conceptions of health and unwellness, as a basis for radical re-imaginings of disability within a Western context. During the course of this research I read eighteen articles regarding the intersections of colonialism, disability, and indigeneity. I studied how Indigenous people and disabled people are similarly marginalized by interlocking forces of colonization and eugenics. I researched the foundations of Eurocentric thought that underpin that colonization and ableism. I learned about the ways in which Indigenous worldviews radically differ from Eurocentric ones, as well as the theoretical and actual effects of those worldviews on Indigenous people with impairments living in traditional Indigenous communities. As a result of this research, since WWU does not currently offer consistent critical disability studies courses, I created an annotated bibliography summarizing the eighteen articles I read, to share with students and faculty. I also created a thirty-minute video presentation outlining my research and the synthesis thereof, which is publicly available on YouTube.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.