Event Title

Defining the Snow Algae Growing Season and Impacts on Community Structure in the North Cascades

Co-Author(s)

Robin Kodner, Max Ismailov

Research Mentor(s)

Kodner, Robin

Description

Bagley Basin is a local and accessible alpine field site that has been the focus of intense study by the Kodner Lab at WWU since 2017, resulting in a robust three-year dataset. The basin is home to a community of alpine-dwelling snow algae. Snow algae occupy an ephemeral habitat that undergoes rapid change in a relatively short period of time. The goal of this project was to create a framework and set of metrics to define the growing season for these algae. Along with defining the growing season, we wanted to investigate whether there is a significant difference in the snow algae communities from year to year, and begin to identify potential environmental drivers of community structure.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2020

End Date

May 2020

Department

Environmental Science

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 22nd, 5:00 PM

Defining the Snow Algae Growing Season and Impacts on Community Structure in the North Cascades

Bagley Basin is a local and accessible alpine field site that has been the focus of intense study by the Kodner Lab at WWU since 2017, resulting in a robust three-year dataset. The basin is home to a community of alpine-dwelling snow algae. Snow algae occupy an ephemeral habitat that undergoes rapid change in a relatively short period of time. The goal of this project was to create a framework and set of metrics to define the growing season for these algae. Along with defining the growing season, we wanted to investigate whether there is a significant difference in the snow algae communities from year to year, and begin to identify potential environmental drivers of community structure.