Co-Author(s)

Kayla Koch, Meredith Boxx, Justin Doyle, Maya Noesen, Kendal Dragotto

Research Mentor(s)

Patrick, David

Description

With the rise of emissions-related climate change, novel renewable energy sources must be realized. At the same time, evolution of the electric distribution grid away from traditionally large, centralized producers toward smaller, decentralized sources drives the need for next generation technologies that can be more readily integrated into the built environment. Nanocrystal (NC)-doped luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are waveguides that absorb diffuse and direct broadband sunlight across their surface and direct narrow-bandwidth, high-brightness light to their edges, for conversion into electricity by coupled, bandgap-matched, photovoltaic (PV) cells. LSCs are insensitive to incident light orientation, partial shading, and can be integrated into the built environment as windows, facades and other structural elements; thus LSCs overcome major barriers of employing traditional PVs in city environments. Recent advances in colloidal semiconductor luminophores have brought LSC technology closer to commercialization. However, complete and uniform dispersion of NCs in polymeric waveguides is necessary to avoid optical light scattering losses which are the largest detriment to efficiency, especially in larger concentrators. Toward this end, I present several studies of the underlying photo-physics of CuInS2/ZnS (CIS) NCs and chemical strategies for their stabilization in polymeric waveguides. The final goal is to improve upon the overall efficiency of NC LSCs and to eventually outline strategies for maintaining low optical losses when making large scale LSCs.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

18-5-2020 12:00 AM

End Date

22-5-2020 12:00 AM

Department

Chemistry

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Keywords

Quantum Dots, Renewable Energy, Colloidal Chemistry, Nanocrystals, Polymers, Ligands, Luminescent Solar Concentrator, Light Scattering, Surfactants

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Tuesday, December 01, 2020

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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May 18th, 12:00 AM May 22nd, 12:00 AM

Uniform Dispersion of Nanoparticles in PMMA Waveguides for Luminescent Solar Concentrators

With the rise of emissions-related climate change, novel renewable energy sources must be realized. At the same time, evolution of the electric distribution grid away from traditionally large, centralized producers toward smaller, decentralized sources drives the need for next generation technologies that can be more readily integrated into the built environment. Nanocrystal (NC)-doped luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are waveguides that absorb diffuse and direct broadband sunlight across their surface and direct narrow-bandwidth, high-brightness light to their edges, for conversion into electricity by coupled, bandgap-matched, photovoltaic (PV) cells. LSCs are insensitive to incident light orientation, partial shading, and can be integrated into the built environment as windows, facades and other structural elements; thus LSCs overcome major barriers of employing traditional PVs in city environments. Recent advances in colloidal semiconductor luminophores have brought LSC technology closer to commercialization. However, complete and uniform dispersion of NCs in polymeric waveguides is necessary to avoid optical light scattering losses which are the largest detriment to efficiency, especially in larger concentrators. Toward this end, I present several studies of the underlying photo-physics of CuInS2/ZnS (CIS) NCs and chemical strategies for their stabilization in polymeric waveguides. The final goal is to improve upon the overall efficiency of NC LSCs and to eventually outline strategies for maintaining low optical losses when making large scale LSCs.