Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2009

Abstract

Data from 44 societies are used to explore sex segregation by field of study. Contrary to accounts linking socioeconomic modernization to a "degendering" of public-sphere institutions, sex typing of curricular fields is stronger in more economically developed contexts. The authors argue that two cultural forces combine in advanced industrial societies to create a new sort of sex segregation regime. The first is gender-essentialist ideology, which has proven to be extremely resilient even in the most liberal-egalitarian of contexts; the second is self-expressive value systems, which create opportunities and incentives for the expression of "gendered selves." Multivariate analyses suggest that structural features of postindustrial labor markets and modern educational systems support the cultivation, realization, and display of gender-specific curricular affinities.

Publication Title

American Journal of Sociology

Volume

114

Issue

4

First Page

924

Last Page

976

Required Publisher's Statement

American Journal of Sociology,

Published by: The University of Chicago Press

Article DOI: 10.1086/595942

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/595942

Subjects - Topical (LCSH)

Women--Education (Higher)--20th century; Professional education of women--20th century; Education, Higher--20th century

Subjects - Names (LCNAF)

Unesco

Genre/Form

articles

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Included in

Sociology Commons

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