Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1993

Abstract

This article explores the historical context and institutional linkages that contributed to the genesis of special education during the early decades of this century. At the heart was the antinomy between a mandate for compulsory attendance and the practical interests for efficient school organization. The dilemma faced by city and state school systems was resolved by the successful anchoring of vocational education within public education and the scientific surety of intelligence testing. Yet key to the genesis of special education was the role of perceived gender differences. Early special education categories of backward pupils and truant and incorrigible pupils were defined by the conception of the ''bad boy,'' which linked special education to the male reformatory.

Publication Title

American Journal of Education

Volume

101

Issue

4

First Page

359

Last Page

392

Required Publisher's Statement

Published by: The University of Chicago Press

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1085770

Subjects - Topical (LCSH)

Special education--United States--20th century; Juvenile delinquents--Vocational education--United States--20th century; Youth with disabilities--Vocational education--United States--20th century;

Subjects - Names (LCNAF)

National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education (U.S.)

Geographic Coverage

United States

Genre/Form

articles

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Included in

Sociology Commons

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