Presentation Title

Strategies for nearshore ecosystem restoration and protection in Puget Sound, WA

Session Title

Session S-01G: New Strategies for Shorelines

Conference Track

Shorelines

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

30-4-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP) is a partnership between the state of Washington and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to develop and implement a large scale, ecosystem- based restoration effort in Puget Sound. PSNERP is also designated as the nearshore component of the regional recovery plan for Puget Sound (Puget Sound Action Agenda). The recently published PSNERP document titled “Strategies for Nearshore Protection and Restoration in Puget Sound” was designed to facilitate and guide restoration, protection and land management efforts in Puget Sound. Strategy recommendations were made for the 744 beach segments or drift cells in Puget Sound based on an evaluation of site potential, degradation and future risk. The recommendations assigned to each drift cell range from ‘enhance’ to ‘restore’ to ‘protect’ with sediment supply being the target of restoration and protection. Consistent with this, shoreline armor removal is the primary restoration strategy for beach systems as described more fully in the PSNERP Management Measures Technical Report. New tools and data are needed to improve our understanding of where, how much and what kind of beach restoration is necessary to regain the lost ecosystem services that beaches once provided. This talk will describe the process and metrics used to develop the strategy recommendations and highlight some of the key uncertainties in beach systems driven by the complexity of beach types in Puget Sound. A key unanswered question related to armor removal is the extent to which partial restoration of a drift cell will provide intended ecological benefits. 1. NOAA Restoration Center

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Apr 30th, 10:30 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

Strategies for nearshore ecosystem restoration and protection in Puget Sound, WA

Room 6E

The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP) is a partnership between the state of Washington and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to develop and implement a large scale, ecosystem- based restoration effort in Puget Sound. PSNERP is also designated as the nearshore component of the regional recovery plan for Puget Sound (Puget Sound Action Agenda). The recently published PSNERP document titled “Strategies for Nearshore Protection and Restoration in Puget Sound” was designed to facilitate and guide restoration, protection and land management efforts in Puget Sound. Strategy recommendations were made for the 744 beach segments or drift cells in Puget Sound based on an evaluation of site potential, degradation and future risk. The recommendations assigned to each drift cell range from ‘enhance’ to ‘restore’ to ‘protect’ with sediment supply being the target of restoration and protection. Consistent with this, shoreline armor removal is the primary restoration strategy for beach systems as described more fully in the PSNERP Management Measures Technical Report. New tools and data are needed to improve our understanding of where, how much and what kind of beach restoration is necessary to regain the lost ecosystem services that beaches once provided. This talk will describe the process and metrics used to develop the strategy recommendations and highlight some of the key uncertainties in beach systems driven by the complexity of beach types in Puget Sound. A key unanswered question related to armor removal is the extent to which partial restoration of a drift cell will provide intended ecological benefits. 1. NOAA Restoration Center