Event Title

Using numerical models to estimate the impact of run-of-river dams on bed load transport processes and channel bed evolution in British Columbia

Presentation Abstract

Using a 1-D morphodynamic model as our primary tool, we are investigating the potential impact of run-of-river dams on sediment transport processes and channel bed evolution. The model is used to predict the grain size distribution of sediment exposed at the surface and in transport as well as the bulk transport rate. The model can predict these quantities as a function of space and time in response to dam closure. Initially the model will be applied to the reach downstream of the powerhouse where the channel hydrology is largely unaltered.Given the geomorphic variability of run-of-river sites in British Columbia, and the variability in operating procedures among the sites, we will model several different sediment supply reduction scenarios (e.g. temporary reduction, sediment pulse scenarios, total elimination). In order to ground the model in reality, we will use field data collected from proposed project sites in British Columbia as inputs to the numerical model. Our goal is to provide general predictions that can be used to estimate long-term cumulative impacts of run-of-river projects on channel morphology and channel bed characteristics. Ultimately, our model predictions will be incorporated into a decision support tool designed to help minimize trade-offs between the economics of project development and the sustainability of aquatic ecosystems in British Columbia.

Session Title

Session S-03G: Ecosystem Services and Impacts of Sediment for Salish Sea Recovery

Conference Track

Shorelines

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

30-4-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 5:00 PM

Location

Room 6E

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 30th, 3:30 PM Apr 30th, 5:00 PM

Using numerical models to estimate the impact of run-of-river dams on bed load transport processes and channel bed evolution in British Columbia

Room 6E

Using a 1-D morphodynamic model as our primary tool, we are investigating the potential impact of run-of-river dams on sediment transport processes and channel bed evolution. The model is used to predict the grain size distribution of sediment exposed at the surface and in transport as well as the bulk transport rate. The model can predict these quantities as a function of space and time in response to dam closure. Initially the model will be applied to the reach downstream of the powerhouse where the channel hydrology is largely unaltered.Given the geomorphic variability of run-of-river sites in British Columbia, and the variability in operating procedures among the sites, we will model several different sediment supply reduction scenarios (e.g. temporary reduction, sediment pulse scenarios, total elimination). In order to ground the model in reality, we will use field data collected from proposed project sites in British Columbia as inputs to the numerical model. Our goal is to provide general predictions that can be used to estimate long-term cumulative impacts of run-of-river projects on channel morphology and channel bed characteristics. Ultimately, our model predictions will be incorporated into a decision support tool designed to help minimize trade-offs between the economics of project development and the sustainability of aquatic ecosystems in British Columbia.