Presentation Title

Characterizing Seafood Risks and Benefits – Getting the Science Right

Session Title

Session S-03B: Washington Fish Consumption Rate: One Number, Hundreds of Human Health and Environmental Management Decisions, Millions of Consumers

Conference Track

Toxics

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

30-4-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 5:00 PM

Abstract

Research to define and convey seafood risks and benefits, such as cultural significance and nutritional value, is critical to making scientifically informed regulatory decisions. Furthermore, life stage determinants and genomic factors can influence susceptibility and alter the risks and benefits of seafood consumption. We have collaborated on seafood consumption surveys among Asian-American women of childbearing age, in particular Korean and Japanese populations, in the Puget Sound area. This is a critical study to consider the overall dietary patterns in determining the benefits and risks from seafood consumption to better understand potential impacts when fish consumption advisories limiting ingestion are proposed. This research directly informs how we should consider issuing fish advisories. Results show disproportionate seafood benefits and ingestion rates, and emphasize the need for research details. For example Korean populations consumed more shellfish than Japanese populations although the consumption of finfish was approximately the same between two populations. A large percentage of these populations did not consume recommended amounts of omega-3 fatty acids even though they consume seafood at a rate much higher than the U.S. average population. Nutritional needs vary across life stage and by pregnancy status, but so do toxicological impacts. When factored in with the role of individual genetic differences and epigenetic determinants of health over time, one is not surprised to find that there is much to consider when both defining and conveying the positive and negative aspects of seafood. This work helps guide regulatory processes at the intersection of nutrition, toxicology, and risk assessment.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Apr 30th, 3:30 PM Apr 30th, 5:00 PM

Characterizing Seafood Risks and Benefits – Getting the Science Right

Room 608-609

Research to define and convey seafood risks and benefits, such as cultural significance and nutritional value, is critical to making scientifically informed regulatory decisions. Furthermore, life stage determinants and genomic factors can influence susceptibility and alter the risks and benefits of seafood consumption. We have collaborated on seafood consumption surveys among Asian-American women of childbearing age, in particular Korean and Japanese populations, in the Puget Sound area. This is a critical study to consider the overall dietary patterns in determining the benefits and risks from seafood consumption to better understand potential impacts when fish consumption advisories limiting ingestion are proposed. This research directly informs how we should consider issuing fish advisories. Results show disproportionate seafood benefits and ingestion rates, and emphasize the need for research details. For example Korean populations consumed more shellfish than Japanese populations although the consumption of finfish was approximately the same between two populations. A large percentage of these populations did not consume recommended amounts of omega-3 fatty acids even though they consume seafood at a rate much higher than the U.S. average population. Nutritional needs vary across life stage and by pregnancy status, but so do toxicological impacts. When factored in with the role of individual genetic differences and epigenetic determinants of health over time, one is not surprised to find that there is much to consider when both defining and conveying the positive and negative aspects of seafood. This work helps guide regulatory processes at the intersection of nutrition, toxicology, and risk assessment.