Event Title

Connecting Property Owners with Shorelines – A Comprehensive Database of Shoreline Data at the Parcel Scale (Need to adjust title and content slightly to be part 1 that matches talk #476 which would be part 2 )

Presentation Abstract

The goal for this project was to create a social marketing behavior change strategy that would lead to residential landowners to improve the way they manage their shorelines, and reduce the perceived need to armor their shores. To better understand the shoreline characteristics and demographics at the parcel unit scale a database of residential shoreline parcels in the Puget Sound was developed that linked parcel data with other existing shoreline data sets. Data sets spatially linked with parcels included: Shorezone data, Sound-wide feeder bluff mapping, a newly compiled shoreline armor layer, and data from the PSNERP change analysis. Considerable pre-processing was required prior to linking the data sets to update datasets. For example, shore armor data was compiled from multiple data sets into a single layer prior to be linked with the parcel data. Erosion potential was estimated for all shores based on the combined shoretype and wave exposure (from Shorezone) to inform appropriate management techniques for each parcel. Once assembled, the county parcel data required extensive processing to accurately equate the shoreline with upland parcels, as many shoreline parcel boundaries are located slightly landward of the high water shoreline while still maintaining a decision-making role on the beach. Once spatially linked, shoreline parcels were attributed with the shoreline data. These data were then used to segment parcels into one of nine categories based on the presence of a home, shoreline armor, and erosion potential. These segments were then used to identify target behaviors for shoreline management, outreach efforts and later social marketing efforts.

Session Title

Session S-03H: Social Science Strategies for Ecosystem Recovery: On-the-Ground Applications of Social Science

Conference Track

Social Science Plus

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

30-4-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 5:00 PM

Location

Room 607

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 30th, 3:30 PM Apr 30th, 5:00 PM

Connecting Property Owners with Shorelines – A Comprehensive Database of Shoreline Data at the Parcel Scale (Need to adjust title and content slightly to be part 1 that matches talk #476 which would be part 2 )

Room 607

The goal for this project was to create a social marketing behavior change strategy that would lead to residential landowners to improve the way they manage their shorelines, and reduce the perceived need to armor their shores. To better understand the shoreline characteristics and demographics at the parcel unit scale a database of residential shoreline parcels in the Puget Sound was developed that linked parcel data with other existing shoreline data sets. Data sets spatially linked with parcels included: Shorezone data, Sound-wide feeder bluff mapping, a newly compiled shoreline armor layer, and data from the PSNERP change analysis. Considerable pre-processing was required prior to linking the data sets to update datasets. For example, shore armor data was compiled from multiple data sets into a single layer prior to be linked with the parcel data. Erosion potential was estimated for all shores based on the combined shoretype and wave exposure (from Shorezone) to inform appropriate management techniques for each parcel. Once assembled, the county parcel data required extensive processing to accurately equate the shoreline with upland parcels, as many shoreline parcel boundaries are located slightly landward of the high water shoreline while still maintaining a decision-making role on the beach. Once spatially linked, shoreline parcels were attributed with the shoreline data. These data were then used to segment parcels into one of nine categories based on the presence of a home, shoreline armor, and erosion potential. These segments were then used to identify target behaviors for shoreline management, outreach efforts and later social marketing efforts.