Presentation Title

Effects of hypoxia on the seasonal cycle of zooplankton communities in Puget Sound, WA

Session Title

Session S-02D: Pelagic Ecology in the Salish Sea II

Conference Track

Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

30-4-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 3:00 PM

Abstract

Hypoxia is increasing in severity with global climate change and is predicted to lead to changes in zooplankton diversity and species composition. In particular, hypoxia is hypothesized to lead to increased dominance of taxa with low metabolic rates such as gelatinous species and cyclopoid copepods, and a decrease in the larger crustaceans that are preferred prey of many upper trophic level organisms. We are studying relationships between ocean chemistry and zooplankton in Puget Sound, Washington—a deep, seasonally hypoxic fjord in the Pacific Northwest that supports a diverse zooplankton community. How zooplankton species composition, behavior, growth, and energy flow to predators are altered by hypoxia is a focus of our research. Here we will examine the hypothesis that seasonal hypoxia leads to changes in zooplankton community structure using in situ sampling from late spring to early fall at four sites along a gradient of oxygen conditions in two contrasting years. We use multi-species analysis techniques to quantify changes in the zooplankton to better understand community-level responses to hypoxia and potential implications to fish.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Apr 30th, 1:30 PM Apr 30th, 3:00 PM

Effects of hypoxia on the seasonal cycle of zooplankton communities in Puget Sound, WA

Room 611-612

Hypoxia is increasing in severity with global climate change and is predicted to lead to changes in zooplankton diversity and species composition. In particular, hypoxia is hypothesized to lead to increased dominance of taxa with low metabolic rates such as gelatinous species and cyclopoid copepods, and a decrease in the larger crustaceans that are preferred prey of many upper trophic level organisms. We are studying relationships between ocean chemistry and zooplankton in Puget Sound, Washington—a deep, seasonally hypoxic fjord in the Pacific Northwest that supports a diverse zooplankton community. How zooplankton species composition, behavior, growth, and energy flow to predators are altered by hypoxia is a focus of our research. Here we will examine the hypothesis that seasonal hypoxia leads to changes in zooplankton community structure using in situ sampling from late spring to early fall at four sites along a gradient of oxygen conditions in two contrasting years. We use multi-species analysis techniques to quantify changes in the zooplankton to better understand community-level responses to hypoxia and potential implications to fish.