Presentation Abstract

Before the Westward Expansion and colonization of what is now Washington State, the Tulalip Tribes had a fully sustainable economy in harmony with the healthy ecosystems of the Snohomish Basin. However, European settlement greatly harmed the Tribes’ people, as well as the lands and resources upon which they depended. A century has passed since natural resources like salmon and forests were abundant. Today, Chinook and other salmon populations have declined near the threat of extinction. To increase the remaining populations of salmon will require more habitat, restoration of hydrology that is compatible with salmon biology, and a climate conducive to salmon abundance. Decision-makers face the obstacle of allocating limited resources to mitigate further environmental damage while resolving conflicting jurisdictional interests related to resource management. Disagreements regarding assessment criteria, coupled with the delay of critical policy decisions, induce paralyzing costs and exhaust time.

Session Title

Session S-03F: Tools for Assessment and Implementation

Conference Track

Planning Assessment & Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

30-4-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 5:00 PM

Location

Room 602-603

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 30th, 3:30 PM Apr 30th, 5:00 PM

Investing in Watershed Services: From Valuation to Funding Mechanisms

Room 602-603

Before the Westward Expansion and colonization of what is now Washington State, the Tulalip Tribes had a fully sustainable economy in harmony with the healthy ecosystems of the Snohomish Basin. However, European settlement greatly harmed the Tribes’ people, as well as the lands and resources upon which they depended. A century has passed since natural resources like salmon and forests were abundant. Today, Chinook and other salmon populations have declined near the threat of extinction. To increase the remaining populations of salmon will require more habitat, restoration of hydrology that is compatible with salmon biology, and a climate conducive to salmon abundance. Decision-makers face the obstacle of allocating limited resources to mitigate further environmental damage while resolving conflicting jurisdictional interests related to resource management. Disagreements regarding assessment criteria, coupled with the delay of critical policy decisions, induce paralyzing costs and exhaust time.