Event Title

Swimming through the carbonscape: A zooplankton-centric view of Puget Sound pH

Presentation Abstract

Understand the carbon chemistry environment experienced by zooplankton in Puget Sound is essential to predicting how ocean acidification will affect these species. Puget sound has a spatially variable and temporally dynamic carbon chemistry environment as a consequence of interacting physical and biological processes. Zooplankton have complex movement patterns as a consequence of passive drifting, active swimming toward or way from stimuli, daily vertical migrations (DVM), and density dependent interactions. We used an individual-based approach to simulate movement of several zooplankton species in a 3-d model of carbon chemistry dynamics in Puget Sound. The unstructured-grid model includes hydrodynamics and water quality variables such as nutrients and oxygen at spatial scales as small as ten meters (horizontal) and temporal scales as small as minutes. We added carbon chemistry to the model using empirically derived local relationships with oxygen, temperature and salinity. Zooplankton movement was modeled for species that exhibit a variety of behaviors exhibited by Puget Sound species. Model output consists of time series of carbon parameter exposure (e.g. pH) that can be used to create realistic conditions for laboratory experiments and to assess vulnerability of zooplankton species to current and future acidification. Vulnerability is a function of exposure (addressed in this study) and sensitivity (addressed in lab experiments). The exposure time series approach moves beyond simple assessment of average conditions to consider species where peak exposures or rates of change in carbon parameters may drive sensitivity.

Session Title

Session S-05A: Frontiers of Ocean Acidification Research in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Location

Room 615-616-617

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Swimming through the carbonscape: A zooplankton-centric view of Puget Sound pH

Room 615-616-617

Understand the carbon chemistry environment experienced by zooplankton in Puget Sound is essential to predicting how ocean acidification will affect these species. Puget sound has a spatially variable and temporally dynamic carbon chemistry environment as a consequence of interacting physical and biological processes. Zooplankton have complex movement patterns as a consequence of passive drifting, active swimming toward or way from stimuli, daily vertical migrations (DVM), and density dependent interactions. We used an individual-based approach to simulate movement of several zooplankton species in a 3-d model of carbon chemistry dynamics in Puget Sound. The unstructured-grid model includes hydrodynamics and water quality variables such as nutrients and oxygen at spatial scales as small as ten meters (horizontal) and temporal scales as small as minutes. We added carbon chemistry to the model using empirically derived local relationships with oxygen, temperature and salinity. Zooplankton movement was modeled for species that exhibit a variety of behaviors exhibited by Puget Sound species. Model output consists of time series of carbon parameter exposure (e.g. pH) that can be used to create realistic conditions for laboratory experiments and to assess vulnerability of zooplankton species to current and future acidification. Vulnerability is a function of exposure (addressed in this study) and sensitivity (addressed in lab experiments). The exposure time series approach moves beyond simple assessment of average conditions to consider species where peak exposures or rates of change in carbon parameters may drive sensitivity.