Presentation Abstract

Shellfish are an important component of our ecosystems. As sessile filter feeders, shellfish offer a valuable resource for revealing how the nearshore can be negatively influenced by anthropogenic activity and natural processes. Research in our lab focuses on using transcriptomic approaches to interrogate physiological responses, which in turn provides important insight into environmental conditions. Several projects will be presented including lab-based trials as well as efforts to characterize natural oyster populations in Puget Sound. More recently we have developed global epigenetic and proteomic approaches that could provide new insight into contaminant exposure and physiological impact. The potential for epigenetic approaches to reveal xenobiotic exposure will be discussed in a broader taxonomic framework as we are just beginning to understand the landscape and function of epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation in shellfish. New approaches and application of shotgun proteomics will also be discussed. Currently these approaches are not realistic solutions for routine monitoring of nearshore water quality, but do offer an un-biased means to develop stressor specific, simple assays for general use.

Session Title

Session S-05B: Water Quality II

Conference Track

Toxics

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Location

Room 608-609

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Genomic approaches to assessing ecosystem health

Room 608-609

Shellfish are an important component of our ecosystems. As sessile filter feeders, shellfish offer a valuable resource for revealing how the nearshore can be negatively influenced by anthropogenic activity and natural processes. Research in our lab focuses on using transcriptomic approaches to interrogate physiological responses, which in turn provides important insight into environmental conditions. Several projects will be presented including lab-based trials as well as efforts to characterize natural oyster populations in Puget Sound. More recently we have developed global epigenetic and proteomic approaches that could provide new insight into contaminant exposure and physiological impact. The potential for epigenetic approaches to reveal xenobiotic exposure will be discussed in a broader taxonomic framework as we are just beginning to understand the landscape and function of epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation in shellfish. New approaches and application of shotgun proteomics will also be discussed. Currently these approaches are not realistic solutions for routine monitoring of nearshore water quality, but do offer an un-biased means to develop stressor specific, simple assays for general use.