Session Title

Session S-05B: Water Quality II

Conference Track

Toxics

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

Stormwater runoff can result in episodic increases of copper concentrations in receiving waters of the Salish Sea basin. Based on several laboratory studies demonstrating that short-term exposures to low copper concentrations can cause olfactory and behavioral effects in Pacific salmon and trout, there is concern that these short-term increases in copper concentrations during storm events could be adversely impacting salmon and trout populations. For example, copper-induced olfactory impairment could potentially reduce the ability of juvenile salmon to avoid predators. Although behavior and olfactory impairment are more sensitive endpoints than the acute lethality endpoint commonly used for evaluating short-term exposures to chemicals, the data available to-date indicate that ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) for copper in freshwater are protective against both behavioral effects and olfactory impairment in fish, particularly when the AWQC were derived using the freshwater biotic ligand model (BLM). The BLM is a bioavailability-based model that predicts copper toxicity as a function of several water chemistry parameters, including, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, alkalinity, calcium, and several other ions in freshwater. Less data on the olfactory and behavioral effects of copper on saltwater species are available relative to that available in fresh water. No experimental evidence available to-date indicates that copper concentrations in marine waters at or below the current EPA marine AWQC for copper (CMC = 4.8 µg/L, CCC = 3.1 µg/L) adversely affects the behavior of any marine fish species tested. The pending draft BLM-based saltwater AWQC for copper also appear to be protective against both behavioral effects and olfactory impairment (key water chemistry parameters in the saltwater BLM are DOC, pH, and salinity). An evaluation of copper concentrations in some representative receiving waters in the Salish Sea basin during storm events, and comparisons to BLM-based copper criteria and behavioral and olfactory effects thresholds for copper, will be presented.

Rights

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Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Protectiveness of Aquatic Life Criteria for Copper Against Olfactory and Behavioral Effects in Freshwater and Saltwater Fish

Room 608-609

Stormwater runoff can result in episodic increases of copper concentrations in receiving waters of the Salish Sea basin. Based on several laboratory studies demonstrating that short-term exposures to low copper concentrations can cause olfactory and behavioral effects in Pacific salmon and trout, there is concern that these short-term increases in copper concentrations during storm events could be adversely impacting salmon and trout populations. For example, copper-induced olfactory impairment could potentially reduce the ability of juvenile salmon to avoid predators. Although behavior and olfactory impairment are more sensitive endpoints than the acute lethality endpoint commonly used for evaluating short-term exposures to chemicals, the data available to-date indicate that ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) for copper in freshwater are protective against both behavioral effects and olfactory impairment in fish, particularly when the AWQC were derived using the freshwater biotic ligand model (BLM). The BLM is a bioavailability-based model that predicts copper toxicity as a function of several water chemistry parameters, including, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, alkalinity, calcium, and several other ions in freshwater. Less data on the olfactory and behavioral effects of copper on saltwater species are available relative to that available in fresh water. No experimental evidence available to-date indicates that copper concentrations in marine waters at or below the current EPA marine AWQC for copper (CMC = 4.8 µg/L, CCC = 3.1 µg/L) adversely affects the behavior of any marine fish species tested. The pending draft BLM-based saltwater AWQC for copper also appear to be protective against both behavioral effects and olfactory impairment (key water chemistry parameters in the saltwater BLM are DOC, pH, and salinity). An evaluation of copper concentrations in some representative receiving waters in the Salish Sea basin during storm events, and comparisons to BLM-based copper criteria and behavioral and olfactory effects thresholds for copper, will be presented.