Presentation Title

Freshwater Bioassessment tools for the Puget Sound Basin: Enhancing a science-based performance measure of stream condition

Session Title

Session S-05C: Using Stream Bugs to Manage and Restore Watersheds

Conference Track

Freshwater

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

Stream bioassessment protocols in the Puget Sound region have been developed and applied by numerous local, tribal, and state jurisdictions since the early 1990s. Numerous (>20) cities, counties, tribes and state agencies in the Puget Sound basin use a multi-metric benthic macroinvertebrate index (Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity, B-IBI) to report stream health. However, a variety of factors such as different sampling and analysis methods made it difficult to compare and evaluate these data on a regional scale. The primary goals of this project are to evaluate differences in sampling methods and to enhance data analysis and data management tools to enable monitoring, reporting and collaboration across watershed and jurisdictional boundaries. Data from more than 3,400 site visits at 950 sites were used to evaluate, recalibrate, and enhance the B-IBI. Side by side samples were collected and analyzed to evaluate differences in sampling protocols. Sensitivity of taxa attributes was improved using empirical data and best available science. The B-IBI was rescored and recalibrated to reflect regional data and updated taxa attributes. A standardized measure of stream condition is critical for regional prioritization for restoration and protection, provides a tool to measure the effectiveness of management actions, and provides a science-based performance measure for streams. Enhancements to the B-IBI and associated data management tools will also strengthen the application of the B-IBI as a Puget Sound Partnership “Vital Signs” indicator of freshwater quality. An overview of this effort will be presented.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Freshwater Bioassessment tools for the Puget Sound Basin: Enhancing a science-based performance measure of stream condition

Room 606

Stream bioassessment protocols in the Puget Sound region have been developed and applied by numerous local, tribal, and state jurisdictions since the early 1990s. Numerous (>20) cities, counties, tribes and state agencies in the Puget Sound basin use a multi-metric benthic macroinvertebrate index (Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity, B-IBI) to report stream health. However, a variety of factors such as different sampling and analysis methods made it difficult to compare and evaluate these data on a regional scale. The primary goals of this project are to evaluate differences in sampling methods and to enhance data analysis and data management tools to enable monitoring, reporting and collaboration across watershed and jurisdictional boundaries. Data from more than 3,400 site visits at 950 sites were used to evaluate, recalibrate, and enhance the B-IBI. Side by side samples were collected and analyzed to evaluate differences in sampling protocols. Sensitivity of taxa attributes was improved using empirical data and best available science. The B-IBI was rescored and recalibrated to reflect regional data and updated taxa attributes. A standardized measure of stream condition is critical for regional prioritization for restoration and protection, provides a tool to measure the effectiveness of management actions, and provides a science-based performance measure for streams. Enhancements to the B-IBI and associated data management tools will also strengthen the application of the B-IBI as a Puget Sound Partnership “Vital Signs” indicator of freshwater quality. An overview of this effort will be presented.