Presentation Abstract

The 692 square mile Lake Washington/Cedar/Sammamish watershed, containing over 1.4 million human inhabitants, is the most populous watershed in the state of Washington. Yet despite its profound alterations, the watershed continues to sustain several salmon stocks including two ESA-listed Chinook salmon populations. Watershed and salmon conservation efforts are led by a collaborative Salmon Recovery Council representing 27 local governments, citizens, non-profits, state and federal agencies. There is strong support for the persistent collection of data to monitor watershed health and salmon recovery in the watershed. We will present results from a multi-year investigation linking biological data to stream habitat, land use and hydrology trends in the watershed, and discuss how this and other information is used to help adaptively manage salmon recovery efforts in the watershed.

Session Title

Session S-05C: Using Stream Bugs to Manage and Restore Watersheds

Conference Track

Freshwater

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Location

Room 606

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Monitoring for Adaptive Management: Status and Trends Monitoring of Aquatic and Riparian Habitats in the Lake Washington/Cedar/Sammamish Watershed

Room 606

The 692 square mile Lake Washington/Cedar/Sammamish watershed, containing over 1.4 million human inhabitants, is the most populous watershed in the state of Washington. Yet despite its profound alterations, the watershed continues to sustain several salmon stocks including two ESA-listed Chinook salmon populations. Watershed and salmon conservation efforts are led by a collaborative Salmon Recovery Council representing 27 local governments, citizens, non-profits, state and federal agencies. There is strong support for the persistent collection of data to monitor watershed health and salmon recovery in the watershed. We will present results from a multi-year investigation linking biological data to stream habitat, land use and hydrology trends in the watershed, and discuss how this and other information is used to help adaptively manage salmon recovery efforts in the watershed.