Session Title

Session S-05C: Using Stream Bugs to Manage and Restore Watersheds

Conference Track

Freshwater

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Abstract

The focus of this presentation is to outline the development of Washington State’s first bioassessment TMDL. Under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and supporting regulations (40 CFR 130.7), states are charged with developing a list of impaired and threatened waters requiring a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). Impaired waters are those not meeting one or more of the applicable Water Quality Standards, including designated uses, narrative criteria and numeric criteria. If biological assessment indicates a waterbody is impaired, the waterbody is included on the state’s section 303(d) list and prioritized for TMDL development. The Soos Creek watershed has Category 5 listings for temperature and dissolved oxygen and the upcoming draft Water Quality Assessment will have three Category 5 listings for bioassessment. The goal of this TMDL is to protect the aquatic life uses through implementation of allocations that address temperature, dissolved oxygen and aquatic health impairments in the basin. The aquatic life uses being protected include the five species of Pacific salmon (Chinook, coho, chum, pink and sockeye), steelhead and cutthroat trout, and a diverse benthic macroinvertebrate community consisting of long-lived and pollutant intolerant species. The Clean Water Act calls for an integrated strategy to restore the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of surface waters. Bioassessment will enhance the DO and temperature TMDLs and provide an important tool to measure improvements in the aquatic life use. This innovative aquatic health TMDL consists of selecting a target B-IBI score to fully support beneficial uses and develop hydrologic allocations and achievable implementation measures within the Soos Creek watershed. The purpose of this presentation is to talk about the process, challenges, approaches and solutions used to develop the first bioassessment TMDL in Washington State.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Rewards, Challenges, Approaches and Solutions for Developing the Soos Creek Bioassessment TMDL

Room 606

The focus of this presentation is to outline the development of Washington State’s first bioassessment TMDL. Under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and supporting regulations (40 CFR 130.7), states are charged with developing a list of impaired and threatened waters requiring a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). Impaired waters are those not meeting one or more of the applicable Water Quality Standards, including designated uses, narrative criteria and numeric criteria. If biological assessment indicates a waterbody is impaired, the waterbody is included on the state’s section 303(d) list and prioritized for TMDL development. The Soos Creek watershed has Category 5 listings for temperature and dissolved oxygen and the upcoming draft Water Quality Assessment will have three Category 5 listings for bioassessment. The goal of this TMDL is to protect the aquatic life uses through implementation of allocations that address temperature, dissolved oxygen and aquatic health impairments in the basin. The aquatic life uses being protected include the five species of Pacific salmon (Chinook, coho, chum, pink and sockeye), steelhead and cutthroat trout, and a diverse benthic macroinvertebrate community consisting of long-lived and pollutant intolerant species. The Clean Water Act calls for an integrated strategy to restore the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of surface waters. Bioassessment will enhance the DO and temperature TMDLs and provide an important tool to measure improvements in the aquatic life use. This innovative aquatic health TMDL consists of selecting a target B-IBI score to fully support beneficial uses and develop hydrologic allocations and achievable implementation measures within the Soos Creek watershed. The purpose of this presentation is to talk about the process, challenges, approaches and solutions used to develop the first bioassessment TMDL in Washington State.