Presentation Title

The Use of Juvenile Chinook Otoliths Related to Restoration Efforts on the Nisqually River

Session Title

Session S-05F: Ecosystem Restoration: Geomorphic Context, Design Considerations, and Success Stories

Conference Track

Restoration

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Kim LarsenFollow

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Abstract

The Nisqually Fall Chinook salmon population is one of 27 stocks in the Puget Sound evolutionary significant unit (ESU) listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Preservation and extensive restoration of the Nisqually delta ecosystem has taken place to assist in recovery of the stock as juvenile Fall Chinook salmon are dependent upon the estuary. Furthermore, a Chinook salmon recovery priority of the Nisqually Indian Tribe is to develop a self-sustaining, naturally spawning population. Currently, this population consists of offspring from both hatchery and natural spawners. Baseline information that includes characterization of life history types, estuary residence times, growth rates, and habitat use is essential to evaluating the potential response of hatchery and natural origin Chinook salmon to restoration efforts and in determining restoration success. Otolith analysis was selected as a means to examine Chinook salmon life history, growth, and residence in the Nisqually Estuary pre- and post-restoration. This research has developed into a collaborative effort with the Nisqually Indian Tribe and other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers involving extensive post-restoration monitoring of the Nisqually delta as related to the response of the delta in support of Chinook salmon. We will report on differential usage of the Nisqually estuary and the expression of life history diversity by natural and hatchery reared juvenile Chinook salmon preceding and following restoration efforts.

Rights

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Language

English

Format

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Type

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

The Use of Juvenile Chinook Otoliths Related to Restoration Efforts on the Nisqually River

Room 6C

The Nisqually Fall Chinook salmon population is one of 27 stocks in the Puget Sound evolutionary significant unit (ESU) listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Preservation and extensive restoration of the Nisqually delta ecosystem has taken place to assist in recovery of the stock as juvenile Fall Chinook salmon are dependent upon the estuary. Furthermore, a Chinook salmon recovery priority of the Nisqually Indian Tribe is to develop a self-sustaining, naturally spawning population. Currently, this population consists of offspring from both hatchery and natural spawners. Baseline information that includes characterization of life history types, estuary residence times, growth rates, and habitat use is essential to evaluating the potential response of hatchery and natural origin Chinook salmon to restoration efforts and in determining restoration success. Otolith analysis was selected as a means to examine Chinook salmon life history, growth, and residence in the Nisqually Estuary pre- and post-restoration. This research has developed into a collaborative effort with the Nisqually Indian Tribe and other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers involving extensive post-restoration monitoring of the Nisqually delta as related to the response of the delta in support of Chinook salmon. We will report on differential usage of the Nisqually estuary and the expression of life history diversity by natural and hatchery reared juvenile Chinook salmon preceding and following restoration efforts.