Event Title

Juvenile Chinook salmon monitoring in the Skagit estuary: application of results at various scales

Presentation Abstract

We show how monitoring the response of juvenile Chinook salmon to estuary restoration in the Skagit tidal delta occurs at multiple nested scales; each scale having potentially different end users of results. All scales and end users are necessary for successful salmon recovery plan implementation. Monitoring at the restoration project scale identifies how well an individual project is performing compared to its objectives. Local stakeholders use project level monitoring results for adaptively managing a project over its life. However, monitoring of individual projects within the context of a larger plan can also play a role in filling data gaps for a watershed or region. We provide an example for a regional learning objective related to self regulated tidegate structures. Monitoring at the watershed scale follows a plan for salmon recovery. In the case of the Skagit, the guidebook is the Skagit Chinook Recovery Plan. An individual restoration project is only one of many in the Skagit estuary; all are necessary to achieve the plan’s goals. We show Skagit estuary restoration progress to date and the benefit these projects are having on Skagit Chinook salmon populations. The stakeholders using watershed level monitoring results operate at the watershed and regional level and are interested in the success of watershed salmon recovery plan implementation. Monitoring at the watershed scale also needs to fit within a regional framework for monitoring and salmon recovery plan implementation. We show how the Skagit’s monitoring indicators fit within the framework for development of monitoring and adaptive management plans for Puget Sound Chinook Recovery for two ecosystem components (Chinook salmon, estuaries).

Session Title

Session S-05G: Beyond the Numbers - How Science Informs Decisions to Catalyze Action

Conference Track

Planning Assessment & Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Location

Room 6E

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Juvenile Chinook salmon monitoring in the Skagit estuary: application of results at various scales

Room 6E

We show how monitoring the response of juvenile Chinook salmon to estuary restoration in the Skagit tidal delta occurs at multiple nested scales; each scale having potentially different end users of results. All scales and end users are necessary for successful salmon recovery plan implementation. Monitoring at the restoration project scale identifies how well an individual project is performing compared to its objectives. Local stakeholders use project level monitoring results for adaptively managing a project over its life. However, monitoring of individual projects within the context of a larger plan can also play a role in filling data gaps for a watershed or region. We provide an example for a regional learning objective related to self regulated tidegate structures. Monitoring at the watershed scale follows a plan for salmon recovery. In the case of the Skagit, the guidebook is the Skagit Chinook Recovery Plan. An individual restoration project is only one of many in the Skagit estuary; all are necessary to achieve the plan’s goals. We show Skagit estuary restoration progress to date and the benefit these projects are having on Skagit Chinook salmon populations. The stakeholders using watershed level monitoring results operate at the watershed and regional level and are interested in the success of watershed salmon recovery plan implementation. Monitoring at the watershed scale also needs to fit within a regional framework for monitoring and salmon recovery plan implementation. We show how the Skagit’s monitoring indicators fit within the framework for development of monitoring and adaptive management plans for Puget Sound Chinook Recovery for two ecosystem components (Chinook salmon, estuaries).