Session Title

Session S-06A: Novel Actions to Address Ocean Acidification in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Alexis Valauri-Orton, N/AFollow

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Abstract

Between July 2012-2013, I traveled on a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship studying how human communities in Norway, Hong Kong, Thailand, New Zealand, the Cook Islands and Peru might be affected by ocean acidification. I interviewed, lived and worked with hundreds of members of marine dependent communities, investigating how they valued resources threatened by ocean acidification. The vast majority of the community members I worked with had no knowledge of ocean acidification and poor ocean literacy. Thus, I developed tools to communicate and contextualize this complex science issue across language and cultural barriers. I found the best method of communication was to explain the science of ocean acidification in a personalized, narrative format, drawing from the lives of my audience to make connections between ocean acidification and resources and practices they value. In order to do this, I needed to listen carefully to the needs and concerns of each community. In this talk, I will share examples of how I did this in a variety of communities, ranging from Seventh Day Adventists in the Cook Islands to scallop farmers in Peru.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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May 1st, 1:30 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Communicating ocean acidification across barriers: Stories and strategies from a year around the world

Room 615-616-617

Between July 2012-2013, I traveled on a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship studying how human communities in Norway, Hong Kong, Thailand, New Zealand, the Cook Islands and Peru might be affected by ocean acidification. I interviewed, lived and worked with hundreds of members of marine dependent communities, investigating how they valued resources threatened by ocean acidification. The vast majority of the community members I worked with had no knowledge of ocean acidification and poor ocean literacy. Thus, I developed tools to communicate and contextualize this complex science issue across language and cultural barriers. I found the best method of communication was to explain the science of ocean acidification in a personalized, narrative format, drawing from the lives of my audience to make connections between ocean acidification and resources and practices they value. In order to do this, I needed to listen carefully to the needs and concerns of each community. In this talk, I will share examples of how I did this in a variety of communities, ranging from Seventh Day Adventists in the Cook Islands to scallop farmers in Peru.