Presentation Abstract

In November of 2012 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) assisted the Washington Department of Health with a dye release experiment at the Chambers Creek Wastewater facility near Steilacoom, WA and in the vicinity of geoduck tracks. Dye was released by being pumped in via the waste stream for over a day, and the effluent tracked by three boats equipped with tracking sensors (fluorometers). We present results from an effort to model this event using a combination of a nearfield (CORMIX) and farfield (GEMSS) models. The nearfield model is used to set the plume stratification over the tidal and meteorological conditions present during the experiment. That output is fed at 15-minute intervals into a pre-existing farfield model (GEMSS) that Ecology had previously calibrated. Because the farfield model was developed for another purpose, the grid cell size was not optimized for the application. How well did this work? Results over the tidal cycle are presented along with a discussion of numerical dispersion inherent in the farfield model. Can numerical dispersion be compensated for and the approach used to explore other plan discharge scenarios?

Session Title

Session S-06C: Water Quality III

Conference Track

Water Quality

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Location

Room 606

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 1st, 1:30 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Modeling Wastewater Discharge with a Hybrid Nearfield and Farfield Approach

Room 606

In November of 2012 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) assisted the Washington Department of Health with a dye release experiment at the Chambers Creek Wastewater facility near Steilacoom, WA and in the vicinity of geoduck tracks. Dye was released by being pumped in via the waste stream for over a day, and the effluent tracked by three boats equipped with tracking sensors (fluorometers). We present results from an effort to model this event using a combination of a nearfield (CORMIX) and farfield (GEMSS) models. The nearfield model is used to set the plume stratification over the tidal and meteorological conditions present during the experiment. That output is fed at 15-minute intervals into a pre-existing farfield model (GEMSS) that Ecology had previously calibrated. Because the farfield model was developed for another purpose, the grid cell size was not optimized for the application. How well did this work? Results over the tidal cycle are presented along with a discussion of numerical dispersion inherent in the farfield model. Can numerical dispersion be compensated for and the approach used to explore other plan discharge scenarios?