Presentation Abstract

The Salish Sea Marine Survival Project (Project) is a multi-year transboundary effort to determine the primary factors affecting juvenile salmon and steelhead survival in the Salish Sea. The Project, coordinated by nonprofits Long Live the Kings (U.S.) and the Pacific Salmon Foundation (Canada), brings together multidisciplinary expertise from over 20 Federal and State agencies, Tribes, academia and nonprofit organizations on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border. Through the development of a comprehensive, ecosystem-based research framework; coordinated data collection and standardization; and improved information sharing, the Project will help managers better understand the critical relationship between salmon and the Salish Sea. This transboundary initiative began in 2012 and will last seven years. Foundational reports include the Pacific Salmon Foundation’s Strait of Georgia Chinook and Coho Proposal (2009) and subsequently the Hypotheses and Preliminary Research Recommendations for Puget Sound (2012). In November 2012, a workshop with 90 participants was held to receive feedback from the broader scientific community regarding the critical elements of a US-Canada research program. The foundational and workshop summary reports are available at the Project web site (www.marinesurvivalproject.org). Science teams are now using this information to develop and implement the necessary research. We will present an overview of the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project, describing its history, leading hypotheses for poor survival, current status in research development and implementation, and how this work will contribute to Salish Sea sustainable resource management and recovery efforts. We will highlight the multi-disciplinary, collaborative nature of this project and the role of non-governmental organizations in aiding this large-scale initiative.

Session Title

Session S-06D: Marine Survival of Salmon and Steelhead: the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project

Conference Track

Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Location

Room 611-612

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 1st, 1:30 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

An overview of the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project: U.S.-Canada integration

Room 611-612

The Salish Sea Marine Survival Project (Project) is a multi-year transboundary effort to determine the primary factors affecting juvenile salmon and steelhead survival in the Salish Sea. The Project, coordinated by nonprofits Long Live the Kings (U.S.) and the Pacific Salmon Foundation (Canada), brings together multidisciplinary expertise from over 20 Federal and State agencies, Tribes, academia and nonprofit organizations on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border. Through the development of a comprehensive, ecosystem-based research framework; coordinated data collection and standardization; and improved information sharing, the Project will help managers better understand the critical relationship between salmon and the Salish Sea. This transboundary initiative began in 2012 and will last seven years. Foundational reports include the Pacific Salmon Foundation’s Strait of Georgia Chinook and Coho Proposal (2009) and subsequently the Hypotheses and Preliminary Research Recommendations for Puget Sound (2012). In November 2012, a workshop with 90 participants was held to receive feedback from the broader scientific community regarding the critical elements of a US-Canada research program. The foundational and workshop summary reports are available at the Project web site (www.marinesurvivalproject.org). Science teams are now using this information to develop and implement the necessary research. We will present an overview of the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project, describing its history, leading hypotheses for poor survival, current status in research development and implementation, and how this work will contribute to Salish Sea sustainable resource management and recovery efforts. We will highlight the multi-disciplinary, collaborative nature of this project and the role of non-governmental organizations in aiding this large-scale initiative.