Session Title

Session S-04A: Frontiers of Ocean Acidification Research in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

1-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Abstract

A central goal of ocean acidification (OA) research is to understand the ecological consequences that future changes in ocean chemistry will have on marine ecosystems. To address this uncertainty researchers rely heavily on manipulative experiments where biological responses are evaluated across different pCO2 treatments. In coastal systems, however, contemporary carbonate chemistry variability remains only partially characterized and patterns of covariation with other biologically important variables such as temperature and oxygen are rarely evaluated or incorporated into experimental design. Here, we compiled a large carbonate chemistry data set that consists of measurements from multiple moorings and ship-based sampling campaigns from the Salish Sea and larger California Current Ecosystem (CCE). We evaluated patterns of pCO2 variability and highlight important covariation between pCO2, temperature, and oxygen. We subsequently compared environmental pCO2-temperature measurements with conditions maintained in OA experiments that used organisms from the Salish Sea and CCE. By drawing such comparisons, researchers can gain insight into the ecological relevancy of previously published OA experimental designs, but also identify species or life history stages that may already be influenced by contemporary carbonate chemistry conditions. We illustrate the implications that covariation among environmental variables can have for the interpretation of OA experimental results and suggest an approach for developing experimental designs with pCO2 levels that better reflect OA hypotheses while simultaneously recognizing natural covariation with other biologically relevant variables.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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May 1st, 8:30 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

Carbonate chemistry covariation with temperature and oxygen in the Salish Sea and California Current Ecosystems: implications for the design of ocean acidification experiments

Room 615-616-617

A central goal of ocean acidification (OA) research is to understand the ecological consequences that future changes in ocean chemistry will have on marine ecosystems. To address this uncertainty researchers rely heavily on manipulative experiments where biological responses are evaluated across different pCO2 treatments. In coastal systems, however, contemporary carbonate chemistry variability remains only partially characterized and patterns of covariation with other biologically important variables such as temperature and oxygen are rarely evaluated or incorporated into experimental design. Here, we compiled a large carbonate chemistry data set that consists of measurements from multiple moorings and ship-based sampling campaigns from the Salish Sea and larger California Current Ecosystem (CCE). We evaluated patterns of pCO2 variability and highlight important covariation between pCO2, temperature, and oxygen. We subsequently compared environmental pCO2-temperature measurements with conditions maintained in OA experiments that used organisms from the Salish Sea and CCE. By drawing such comparisons, researchers can gain insight into the ecological relevancy of previously published OA experimental designs, but also identify species or life history stages that may already be influenced by contemporary carbonate chemistry conditions. We illustrate the implications that covariation among environmental variables can have for the interpretation of OA experimental results and suggest an approach for developing experimental designs with pCO2 levels that better reflect OA hypotheses while simultaneously recognizing natural covariation with other biologically relevant variables.