Presentation Title

A survey of wastewater indicator compounds and effects in field-exposed salmonids in the Stillaguamish Watershed, WA, USA.

Session Title

Session S-04B: Water Quality I

Conference Track

Toxics

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

1-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 10:00 AM

Abstract

Many toxicants and emerging contaminants are unregulated and some considered potentially endocrine disrupting substances that are discharged to aquatic ecosystems via human activities (e.g., in wastewater effluent, urban and agricultural runoff). This study investigated the presence of wastewater, and other selected, compounds in the surface waters of the Stillaguamish River watershed, Washington, and the physiological responses of field-exposed fish. The objectives of the study were two fold; describe the presence and concentration of wastewater compounds (WWC)’s in surface waters of the Stillaguamish watershed and evaluate physiological consequences of field-exposed juvenile salmonids to these compounds. The study included sampling presence and concentration of WWC’s by deploying Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) devices throughout small streams receiving non-point source inputs and fish tissues analyzed for contaminants. Chemical analysis indicate low detection frequency in non-point source small streams and low tissue concentrations. Field exposure to juvenile salmonids involved a 28-day caged Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) study in 2011 and collection and sampling of resident cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in 2012. Liver, gallbladder, and blood plasma samples were collected from fish and used for chemical and physiological measurements. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) metabolites were evaluated in composite gall bladder tissues from the caged Chinook salmon; however, most analytes were not detected above the reporting limits of 6-22 ng/mL bile, recovery corrected. Vitellogenin protein was assessed in blood plasma from juvenile, male cutthroat trout, but showed few measurable detections. A targeted cDNA microarray designed for rainbow trout (Wiseman and others 2007) was hybridized with RNA extracted from the liver tissues with both the 2011 caged Chinook and 2012 field collected rainbow trout. Analysis of gene responses are still in progress, but preliminary results suggest overall weak responses, relative to controls, and similar gene response patterns from caged Chinook and free-swimming cutthroat trout.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

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May 1st, 8:30 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

A survey of wastewater indicator compounds and effects in field-exposed salmonids in the Stillaguamish Watershed, WA, USA.

Room 608-609

Many toxicants and emerging contaminants are unregulated and some considered potentially endocrine disrupting substances that are discharged to aquatic ecosystems via human activities (e.g., in wastewater effluent, urban and agricultural runoff). This study investigated the presence of wastewater, and other selected, compounds in the surface waters of the Stillaguamish River watershed, Washington, and the physiological responses of field-exposed fish. The objectives of the study were two fold; describe the presence and concentration of wastewater compounds (WWC)’s in surface waters of the Stillaguamish watershed and evaluate physiological consequences of field-exposed juvenile salmonids to these compounds. The study included sampling presence and concentration of WWC’s by deploying Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) devices throughout small streams receiving non-point source inputs and fish tissues analyzed for contaminants. Chemical analysis indicate low detection frequency in non-point source small streams and low tissue concentrations. Field exposure to juvenile salmonids involved a 28-day caged Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) study in 2011 and collection and sampling of resident cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in 2012. Liver, gallbladder, and blood plasma samples were collected from fish and used for chemical and physiological measurements. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) metabolites were evaluated in composite gall bladder tissues from the caged Chinook salmon; however, most analytes were not detected above the reporting limits of 6-22 ng/mL bile, recovery corrected. Vitellogenin protein was assessed in blood plasma from juvenile, male cutthroat trout, but showed few measurable detections. A targeted cDNA microarray designed for rainbow trout (Wiseman and others 2007) was hybridized with RNA extracted from the liver tissues with both the 2011 caged Chinook and 2012 field collected rainbow trout. Analysis of gene responses are still in progress, but preliminary results suggest overall weak responses, relative to controls, and similar gene response patterns from caged Chinook and free-swimming cutthroat trout.