Presentation Abstract

Restoration and conservation efforts are abundant throughout Puget Sound, and many are performed on a local scale. Several success stories have emerged showing effectiveness monitoring data that identify successful changes in the ecosystem brought about by these targeted restoration projects. This presentation will address several examples, including: 1. The Thea Foss Waterway – City of Tacoma. Once heavily polluted and largely abandoned as a residential area, the Thea Foss Waterway now boasts dramatically cleaner waters and a thriving downtown area. Enhanced maintenance, in combination with the existing aggressive source control and clean up program, resulted in statistically significant reductions for several contaminants, including metals, pesticides, and PAHs. 2. One Millionth Tree - Whatcom County Conservation District. Degraded riparian areas and water quality limit salmon and steelhead recovery in Puget Sound and can negatively affect shellfish beds. The Whatcom County Conservation District Conservation Resource Enhancement Program (CREP) provides assistance to landowners who wish to install vegetative buffers on their property that provide critical shade and act as water quality filters. On April 20, 2013 (Earth Day) the one millionth CREP tree was planted in Acme, WA. Other examples will include various restoration efforts in Kitsap County and other locations around Puget Sound. Along with detailing some successful restoration activities, this presentation will summarize common mechanisms for successful restoration processes that have been employed at the local level. This presentation will be a companion presentation to 1. The 2013 State of the Sound: Status of the ecosystem, proposed by Nathalie Hamel (Puget Sound Partnership), and 2. 2013 State of the Sound: Accountability and funding, proposed by Katherine Boyd and Alex Mitchell (Puget Sound Partnership). The four presenters will discuss the linkages among tracking, ecosystem indicators, and effectiveness monitoring in Puget Sound recovery efforts.

Session Title

Session S-08F: Emerging Tools for Synthesizing and Communicating Ecosystem Information I

Conference Track

Planning Assessment & Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Location

Room 602-603

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

Success in the Sound: Local Examples of How Restoration Efforts Have Succeeded

Room 602-603

Restoration and conservation efforts are abundant throughout Puget Sound, and many are performed on a local scale. Several success stories have emerged showing effectiveness monitoring data that identify successful changes in the ecosystem brought about by these targeted restoration projects. This presentation will address several examples, including: 1. The Thea Foss Waterway – City of Tacoma. Once heavily polluted and largely abandoned as a residential area, the Thea Foss Waterway now boasts dramatically cleaner waters and a thriving downtown area. Enhanced maintenance, in combination with the existing aggressive source control and clean up program, resulted in statistically significant reductions for several contaminants, including metals, pesticides, and PAHs. 2. One Millionth Tree - Whatcom County Conservation District. Degraded riparian areas and water quality limit salmon and steelhead recovery in Puget Sound and can negatively affect shellfish beds. The Whatcom County Conservation District Conservation Resource Enhancement Program (CREP) provides assistance to landowners who wish to install vegetative buffers on their property that provide critical shade and act as water quality filters. On April 20, 2013 (Earth Day) the one millionth CREP tree was planted in Acme, WA. Other examples will include various restoration efforts in Kitsap County and other locations around Puget Sound. Along with detailing some successful restoration activities, this presentation will summarize common mechanisms for successful restoration processes that have been employed at the local level. This presentation will be a companion presentation to 1. The 2013 State of the Sound: Status of the ecosystem, proposed by Nathalie Hamel (Puget Sound Partnership), and 2. 2013 State of the Sound: Accountability and funding, proposed by Katherine Boyd and Alex Mitchell (Puget Sound Partnership). The four presenters will discuss the linkages among tracking, ecosystem indicators, and effectiveness monitoring in Puget Sound recovery efforts.