Presentation Title

EBMBase: A knowledge capture framework for overcoming the Ecosystem-Based Management communication gap

Session Title

Session S-08F: Emerging Tools for Synthesizing and Communicating Ecosystem Information I

Conference Track

Planning Assessment & Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Abstract

As science has advanced, the depth and breadth of accumulated knowledge has led to the scattering of disciplines across the landscape of worldly mysteries. Each of us strives to understand that part of the landscape where we work, using the language developed by those who arrived there before us. We are aware of work done in other parts of the landscape, but we seldom need to engage it. That is, until we realized that to effectively manage the impacts of our activities on natural systems, an interdisciplinary effort would be required. Ecosystem-based management (EBM) strives to recognize the full array of interactions within an ecosystem that includes humans. This effort is not only interdisciplinary (involving multiple scientific disciplines) but also transdisciplinary (extending beyond science to stakeholders, and others). Given the diversity of scientific disciplines and in the broader stakeholder community, communication is critical. However, in such heterogeneous groups, communication is typically confounded by jargon. This is particularly true for something as broad and all-encompassing as EBM. We argue that EBM would advance much faster, and with less conflict, if knowledge transfer between the diverse groups was improved, and learning from past experiences enhanced. To that end, we are exploring ways of standardizing how EBM knowledge is represented, and through that how EBM efforts are represented. We begin with the assertion that any EBM context can be defined in terms of Entities - ecosystem components, activities, communities, and Relationships - impacts, benefits, processes. We argue that there exists a comprehensive set of such Entities and Relationships that, along with their attributes, would be sufficient for defining any EBM context. Once defined, this ontology (EBMView) would provide a straightforward method for standardizing and integrating the knowledge held by the groups involved. It would also serve as a framework with which to build EBMBase - a searchable, analyzable repository of EBM case studies represented in EBMView. The advantages of such a standardized representation of a diverse collection of EBM applications are myriad, all stemming from improved knowledge representation. These include streamlined communication, faster knowledge transfer, increased understanding, and reduced conflict among EBM participants.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

EBMBase: A knowledge capture framework for overcoming the Ecosystem-Based Management communication gap

Room 602-603

As science has advanced, the depth and breadth of accumulated knowledge has led to the scattering of disciplines across the landscape of worldly mysteries. Each of us strives to understand that part of the landscape where we work, using the language developed by those who arrived there before us. We are aware of work done in other parts of the landscape, but we seldom need to engage it. That is, until we realized that to effectively manage the impacts of our activities on natural systems, an interdisciplinary effort would be required. Ecosystem-based management (EBM) strives to recognize the full array of interactions within an ecosystem that includes humans. This effort is not only interdisciplinary (involving multiple scientific disciplines) but also transdisciplinary (extending beyond science to stakeholders, and others). Given the diversity of scientific disciplines and in the broader stakeholder community, communication is critical. However, in such heterogeneous groups, communication is typically confounded by jargon. This is particularly true for something as broad and all-encompassing as EBM. We argue that EBM would advance much faster, and with less conflict, if knowledge transfer between the diverse groups was improved, and learning from past experiences enhanced. To that end, we are exploring ways of standardizing how EBM knowledge is represented, and through that how EBM efforts are represented. We begin with the assertion that any EBM context can be defined in terms of Entities - ecosystem components, activities, communities, and Relationships - impacts, benefits, processes. We argue that there exists a comprehensive set of such Entities and Relationships that, along with their attributes, would be sufficient for defining any EBM context. Once defined, this ontology (EBMView) would provide a straightforward method for standardizing and integrating the knowledge held by the groups involved. It would also serve as a framework with which to build EBMBase - a searchable, analyzable repository of EBM case studies represented in EBMView. The advantages of such a standardized representation of a diverse collection of EBM applications are myriad, all stemming from improved knowledge representation. These include streamlined communication, faster knowledge transfer, increased understanding, and reduced conflict among EBM participants.