Session Title

Session S-08G: Rethinking Our Waterways: Effective Collaboration with Landowners, Project Partners and Decision Makers

Conference Track

Shorelines

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Michelle Murphy, Stewardship ManagerFollow

Start Date

2-5-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 10:00 AM

Abstract

The collaborative process plays a critical role in habitat restoration. With support from a federal grant, the Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group has been working with the Samish Nation to restore areas along the Samish River after the removal of the noxious weed knotweed. This effort has involved a collaborative strategy between the Samish and Skagit Fisheries to engage landowners and the community to achieve restoration and noxious weed control. In addition, Skagit Fisheries has a broader approach to community engagement and working with landowners to achieve restoration for salmon habitat. Case examples will be presented to showcase these efforts.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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May 2nd, 8:30 AM May 2nd, 10:00 AM

Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group Community Based Restoration: the value of developing partnerships for salmon recovery

Room 6E

The collaborative process plays a critical role in habitat restoration. With support from a federal grant, the Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group has been working with the Samish Nation to restore areas along the Samish River after the removal of the noxious weed knotweed. This effort has involved a collaborative strategy between the Samish and Skagit Fisheries to engage landowners and the community to achieve restoration and noxious weed control. In addition, Skagit Fisheries has a broader approach to community engagement and working with landowners to achieve restoration for salmon habitat. Case examples will be presented to showcase these efforts.