Presentation Abstract

As social scientists develop promising new ways to measure Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES) for decision-making, the question becomes if and how political decision-makers integrate this information into natural resources policy and management. My talk will dissect participatory value mapping as a method for bringing CES into the legislative processes. Value mapping uses spatially explicit surveys to reveal the density and distribution of values (both monetary and non-monetary) that stakeholders attribute to their environment. In a study conducted in 2013, I explored the use of this method to inform Shoreline Master Programs on the Olympic Peninsula. I used Conceptual Content Cognitive Mapping and Q-Methodology to test the effect of a set of Forest Service value maps on the decision-making processes of the region’s mayors, county commissioners, and state-appointed politicians. Understanding the power of participatory mapping for political decision-making sheds light on the potential for CES to integrate socio-cultural dimensions of ecosystems into mainstream environmental management.

Session Title

Session S-09H: Trading Cultural Ecosystem Services from Data Collection to Decision Making

Conference Track

Social Science Plus

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2014 : Seattle, Wash.)

Document Type

Event

Start Date

2-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2014 12:00 PM

Location

Room 607

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 12:00 PM

Operationalizing Cultural Ecosystem Services for Political Decision-Making

Room 607

As social scientists develop promising new ways to measure Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES) for decision-making, the question becomes if and how political decision-makers integrate this information into natural resources policy and management. My talk will dissect participatory value mapping as a method for bringing CES into the legislative processes. Value mapping uses spatially explicit surveys to reveal the density and distribution of values (both monetary and non-monetary) that stakeholders attribute to their environment. In a study conducted in 2013, I explored the use of this method to inform Shoreline Master Programs on the Olympic Peninsula. I used Conceptual Content Cognitive Mapping and Q-Methodology to test the effect of a set of Forest Service value maps on the decision-making processes of the region’s mayors, county commissioners, and state-appointed politicians. Understanding the power of participatory mapping for political decision-making sheds light on the potential for CES to integrate socio-cultural dimensions of ecosystems into mainstream environmental management.