Event Title

Shuck It – Workshop Findings on Implementing Shell Recycling in Puget Sound

Presentation Abstract

In 2011, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) started the National Shellfish Initiative to support increases in the populations of coastal bivalves through both restoration and commercial production. Washington State, recognizing the importance of coastal bivalves, has since convened the Washington Shellfish Initiative to improve the state’s shellfish resources by 2020. This initiative is multi-faceted and included the formation of a Blue Ribbon Panel to recommend strategies to mitigate ocean acidification. Specific actions were identified including 6.1.2, which calls for the expanded use of shell to remediate impacts of local acidification on shellfish. To date, efforts focused on implementing action 6.1.2 have not been undertaken. As such, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) held a one-day workshop with representation from pathologists, shellfish aquaculture industry, non-profits, and tribes, with a focus on evaluating the benefits and risk of implementation of a shell recycling program in Puget Sound, that could be used for such actions as 6.1.2. While education and outreach benefits were acknowledged, the greater risk of diseases, identified knowledge gaps, logistics and feasibility, and cost outweighed the benefits identified. This presentation reviews the pros and cons of implementing a shell recycling program in Puget Sound and provides an overview of knowledge gaps and next steps identified from this workshop.

Session Title

Tackling Ocean Acidification in the Salish Sea: Six creative projects that explore mitigation, adaptation and messaging

Conference Track

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Shuck It – Workshop Findings on Implementing Shell Recycling in Puget Sound

2016SSEC

In 2011, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) started the National Shellfish Initiative to support increases in the populations of coastal bivalves through both restoration and commercial production. Washington State, recognizing the importance of coastal bivalves, has since convened the Washington Shellfish Initiative to improve the state’s shellfish resources by 2020. This initiative is multi-faceted and included the formation of a Blue Ribbon Panel to recommend strategies to mitigate ocean acidification. Specific actions were identified including 6.1.2, which calls for the expanded use of shell to remediate impacts of local acidification on shellfish. To date, efforts focused on implementing action 6.1.2 have not been undertaken. As such, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) held a one-day workshop with representation from pathologists, shellfish aquaculture industry, non-profits, and tribes, with a focus on evaluating the benefits and risk of implementation of a shell recycling program in Puget Sound, that could be used for such actions as 6.1.2. While education and outreach benefits were acknowledged, the greater risk of diseases, identified knowledge gaps, logistics and feasibility, and cost outweighed the benefits identified. This presentation reviews the pros and cons of implementing a shell recycling program in Puget Sound and provides an overview of knowledge gaps and next steps identified from this workshop.