Presentation Title

Vancouver: Leadership on Climate and Renewables

Session Title

Upping the Action: Regional Climate Change Abatement

Conference Track

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Ian Neville, City of VancouverFollow

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

Vancouver, BC has 25 years of experience in taking action on climate change. Already a world leader in the development of complete, compact, and livable communities that have some of the lowest greenhouse gas emissions per person in the developed world, Vancouver is continuing on its path of Climate Leadership through the continuation of the Greenest City Action Plan to 2020, and the eventual transition to derive 100% of Vancouver’s energy from renewables by 2050 through its Renewable City Strategy.

Vancouver seeks to eliminate its dependence on fossil fuels, first by reducing community-based greenhouse gas emissions by 33% from 2007 levels by 2020; and, by 80% by 2050. The 2007 baseline year is equivalent to 1990 emissions, due to Vancouver’s early climate action.

The transition to renewable energy will be achieved using a strategic approach to (1) Reduce Energy Use; (2) Shift Energy Use to Renewable Sources; and (3) Increase the Supply of Renewable Energy for the remaining demand. Emission reductions will be achieved through priority actions such as converting existing hospital steam heat networks to renewable energy and developing four new neighbourhood renewable energy systems; reducing personal vehicle travel through active transportation and expanded public transit, combined with the electrification of personal vehicles and renewable liquid fuel use in heavier transport; and, advancing building performance to achieve net zero buildings as the standard for new construction before 2030.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Vancouver: Leadership on Climate and Renewables

2016SSEC

Vancouver, BC has 25 years of experience in taking action on climate change. Already a world leader in the development of complete, compact, and livable communities that have some of the lowest greenhouse gas emissions per person in the developed world, Vancouver is continuing on its path of Climate Leadership through the continuation of the Greenest City Action Plan to 2020, and the eventual transition to derive 100% of Vancouver’s energy from renewables by 2050 through its Renewable City Strategy.

Vancouver seeks to eliminate its dependence on fossil fuels, first by reducing community-based greenhouse gas emissions by 33% from 2007 levels by 2020; and, by 80% by 2050. The 2007 baseline year is equivalent to 1990 emissions, due to Vancouver’s early climate action.

The transition to renewable energy will be achieved using a strategic approach to (1) Reduce Energy Use; (2) Shift Energy Use to Renewable Sources; and (3) Increase the Supply of Renewable Energy for the remaining demand. Emission reductions will be achieved through priority actions such as converting existing hospital steam heat networks to renewable energy and developing four new neighbourhood renewable energy systems; reducing personal vehicle travel through active transportation and expanded public transit, combined with the electrification of personal vehicles and renewable liquid fuel use in heavier transport; and, advancing building performance to achieve net zero buildings as the standard for new construction before 2030.