Presentation Title

Turning up the Heat on Sea Star Wasting DIsease

Session Title

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and marine pathogens in a changing world

Conference Track

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

A sea star wasting disease (SSWD) epizootic linked to a densovirus devastated populations of Asteroidea over thousands of miles of the North American Pacific Coast in 2013, 2014 and 2015. Time series monitoring of the keystone intertidal species Pisaster ochraceus from the San Juan Islands, South Puget Sound, and Washington outer coast, showed rapid progression of the outbreak, extremely high mortality rates in 2014, and continuing levels of wasting in the survivors in 2015. Peak prevalence of disease and mortality at 16 sites ranged to 100%, with a mean of 61%. Analysis of field surveys showed strong size-specific and temperature-dependent disease risk. In laboratory experiments increased temperature accelerated disease progression and differentially affected adult and juvenile ochre stars. Warm temperature anomalies recorded in the summer of 2014 may have contributed to the rate and extent of SSWD impacts in the San Juan Islands. A subtidal species, Pycnopodia helianthoides, is more severely affected and currently undetected in our San Juan Island surveys and many diver reports from California to SE Alaska. This raises the question of what the longer term biodiversity impacts will be from this epizootic.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Turning up the Heat on Sea Star Wasting DIsease

2016SSEC

A sea star wasting disease (SSWD) epizootic linked to a densovirus devastated populations of Asteroidea over thousands of miles of the North American Pacific Coast in 2013, 2014 and 2015. Time series monitoring of the keystone intertidal species Pisaster ochraceus from the San Juan Islands, South Puget Sound, and Washington outer coast, showed rapid progression of the outbreak, extremely high mortality rates in 2014, and continuing levels of wasting in the survivors in 2015. Peak prevalence of disease and mortality at 16 sites ranged to 100%, with a mean of 61%. Analysis of field surveys showed strong size-specific and temperature-dependent disease risk. In laboratory experiments increased temperature accelerated disease progression and differentially affected adult and juvenile ochre stars. Warm temperature anomalies recorded in the summer of 2014 may have contributed to the rate and extent of SSWD impacts in the San Juan Islands. A subtidal species, Pycnopodia helianthoides, is more severely affected and currently undetected in our San Juan Island surveys and many diver reports from California to SE Alaska. This raises the question of what the longer term biodiversity impacts will be from this epizootic.